Yahoo Answers is shutting down on May 4th, 2021 (Eastern Time) and beginning April 20th, 2021 (Eastern Time) the Yahoo Answers website will be in read-only mode. There will be no changes to other Yahoo properties or services, or your Yahoo account. You can find more information about the Yahoo Answers shutdown and how to download your data on this help page.

Broadband speeds on UK openreach network?

I'm on a 63mbps package with an openreach FTTC provider and im getting in reality about 40mbps (which to be honest is fine for me). If I switch to a 36mbps package (again openreach provider) to save some money how is the speed actually regulated.

I.e. Is the fact I get 40mbps now a good indicator I'll get the 36mbps. Or is the way its controlled a bit more complicated than that, I wondered if because I'm getting about 65% of advertised speed now, would I only get that on a lower package, that would only be about 23mbps which I'm not sure would be enough for me. 

Any advice from anyone who knows how this works would be appreciated. 

2 Answers

Relevance
  • 1 month ago
    Favorite Answer

    I have 100mbps synchronous fiber at home.  I used to have 50mpbs.  I notice no difference at all since the upgrade.  I didn't upgrade for faster speed, I moved apartments.  The new apartment came with faster Internet included.  But again, I do not do anything at 100mbps that I couldn't do just as fast and easy at 50mbps.  Speed tests regularly show me near 87/95 download/upload.  So I'm pretty much at the maximum of my theoretical connection speed. 

    You need to understand something about the Internet.  YOUR connection is only one small piece of a very large puzzle.  As a simple example, if you are streaming video from a server capped at 5mbps per connection, then your video will stream no faster than 5mbps.  Having said that, if you are happy with 40mbps indicated, you most likely would be JUST as happy at 23mbps indicated.  

    To me, it seems logical to switch to the 36mbps plan to save money.  Most likely outcome is that you will pay less for the same speed.  But even if your speed slows down a bit, I doubt if you'd even notice...apart from running speed tests, that is.  

  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    BT will provide full fibre optic cable if you twist their arm. Or Virgin can provide very fast speeds at a price. Use Uswitch to compare Broadband.

Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.