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Do the following sentences have the same meaning?

I am mirthful / I am happy.

12 Answers

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago
    Favorite Answer

    No.

    I have lived 67 years without ever saying or writing the word mirthful!

    To me, being happy is being content and being quiet.

    But being mirthful is being happy but not being content or quiet about it.  You laugh or make a ruckus about it.

    As I said, it's my opinion. 

    Others may not agree.

  • 1 month ago

    In the broadest possible sense, yes; but no native English speaker would think of "happy" and "mirthful" as synonyms. We use them in quite different ways and in quite different situations.

  • Vivian
    Lv 5
    1 month ago

    Happy adjective – Experiencing pleasure, satisfaction, or delight. Mirthful is a synonym for happy in satisfied topic. In some cases you can use "Mirthful" instead an adjective "Happy", when it comes to topics like blithe.

  • denise
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Yes, they mean the same thing.

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    No.  "Mirth" and "happiness" are not the same thing.  And no native English-speaker would say "I am mirthful."

  • 1 month ago

    Mirth is  not  quite the same as happy.    Mirth is like whimsy or playfulness. Glee  or Joy. 

  • 1 month ago

    Yeah, for the sake of using it in everyday English, they would be interchangable, but if you want to split hairs, mirthful actually means full of mirth, merry or amusing, which technically isn't quite the same as being happy.

  • ..
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    More or less, but who says mirthful in the 21st century PH? I'm hoping for a mirthful evening because, I'm having a glass OR TWO of orange wine. It doesn't quite have the same ring to it as saying happy. :-(

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  • 1 month ago

    Mirthful is not the way to phrase it. Right way is:

     "I am full of mirth"

    This is according to the urban dictionay. But 'mirth' is basically the same as' happy'.  MOre of the outward expression. Merry, joyful, playful are closer. But an old term, not much used.

    Source(s): Native American English speaker for 68 years.
  • 1 month ago

    mirthful refers to fun more than happiness.  You might be happy if full of fun, or maybe not, hard to say. Some people use humor (or any other sort of mental amusement, things that might cause laughter or mirth) to cover or distract themselves from their unhappiness. They are not the same things.

    Pretty unusual to declare the self as mirthful.

  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    No one in the history of the world and other great cities has ever said I am mirthful.

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