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Asep
Lv 7
Asep asked in Science & MathematicsPhysics · 1 month ago

Why aren’t we attracted to magnets?

We have iron in our blood

12 Answers

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  • we are.

    we are magnets ourselves, we 'attract' ' like minded individuals'.

    we have our own barriers and 'stay away from me/go away/f*** off' alerts - which can or cannot be read by other individuals.

    we are social creatures but that does not imply we must socialise with EVERY human being and enjoy the interactions with them.

    this is why we pick and choose and this is why as humans, we bond better with those who share our views and mindsets on society, culture and the world in general.

    going back to your question,  I believe humans are magnets.

    we either attract or repel one another.

    There is chemistry and physics involved in this at the root level and decisions we make consciously are driven by these two branches of science.

  • garry
    Lv 6
    1 month ago

    iron the metal or iron the mineral , 2 different things ..

  • 1 month ago

    We are............................

  • 1 month ago

    IF (and this is a big "if") a magnet was strong enough to attract your body through its action on the little quantity of iron it contains, you'd already be dead:

    A magnetic field THAT strong will affect the very shape of the ferromagnetic atoms (including iron, rust and cobalt) and hinder the normal chemical interactions. Plus it would pull these atoms all to one side of whatever organ or vessel that contains them, to the point of causing leaks (individual atoms being pulled so hard through the tissue).

    If you stand in a magnetic field (one that does not kill you), it will have SOME effect on the iron within you... however this effect will have no overall effect on your body (it will not be enough for you to be pulled towards the magnet).

    Tides have, somehow, the same "problem".  Because you do have some size (say almost 2 metres from one end to the other), the gravity of the Moon should be different on the ends of your body (distance to the Moon could be different by 2 metres). However, the difference in tidal force you feel is infinitesimal. It would not be measurable.

    Earth spins: you stand on a spinning globe. Your head is spinning faster than your feet (simply because it is slightly further away from Earth's centre). Should you not feel dizzy? In practice, the effect is waaaaay too small for that.

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  • 1 month ago

    This has to be the most ridiculous question. Why isn't wood attracted to magnets?

  • oubaas
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Iron content is so small that the resulting force can be hardly noticed ...

  • 1 month ago

    In order to experience a net translating force from a (non-uniform) magnetic field, an iron atom must maintain a significant and sustained alignment with the field.  At normal temperatures, the thermal agitation of a single atom (or molecule) prevents this.  Within a microscopic crystal of a ferromagnetic material, quantum interactions with nearby similar atoms helps maintain alignment with a crystal axis.  The crystal can then experience a net force.

  • 1 month ago

    The iron in blood is attracted by a magnet.

    It is more strongly affected if it is not carrying blood.

    It takes a very strong magnet to affect the iron in your body except for shrapnel.

    There is not enough Iron in your body to stick to a normal household sized magnet except for shrapnel.

  • Rita
    Lv 6
    1 month ago

    Hemoglobin in our blood is mostly attached to oxygen. Also, blood is composed mostly of 'water,' which tends to repel from magnets. So even if you put a strong magnet close to your body, you can see your body moving away rather than sticking to it.

  • 1 month ago

    iron compounds, such as in our bodies, are not magnetic, just elemental iron.

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