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Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Education & ReferenceWords & Wordplay · 1 month ago

Which one is grammatically correct ? "I eating that apple is good for my health" OR "Me eating that apple is good for my health" ?

Which one is grammatically correct ?

"I eating that apple is good for my health"

OR

"Me eating that apple is good for my health" ?

12 Answers

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  • ?
    Lv 4
    1 month ago

    Only the second is correct.  But it is clumsy as hell and people would give you a funny look.  You should say "Apples are good for my health".  "Me" is redundant to "my" and "eating" is understood without saying it.

  • 1 month ago

    Seeing that eating an apple is likely to be good for the health of ONLY the person eating it, it's completely unnecessary to say WHO is eating it.

    Eating an apple is good for my health.

    or more generally, "Apples are good for our health".

  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    Neither is correct.  And some ignorant person here doesn't know that.

    My eating that apple is good for my health.

    "Eating" is the subject of the verb "is."  "My" indicates who's doing the eating.

    Source(s): English teacher
  • 1 month ago

    Neither: "eating" in this sentence is a "gerund", a verb used as a noun, so the only correct form is "My eating....". But the gerund is going the way of the subjunctive case: so few learned it or remember it that most would now say"Me eating...", which makes anyone who knows correct English wince!

    Some would just omit the pronoun, but then it could mean that you or someone else eating an apple is good for my health. So if you want to be both precise and grammaticlly correct you would say "My eating..."

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  • 1 month ago

    The books say "my." Most people say "me." Nobody says "I."

  • 1 month ago

    Not Me or I.

    Just, "Eating that apple is good for my health". At least in,American English 

    Source(s): Native American English speaker, for 68 years
  • 1 month ago

    Neither, really. You don't need either 'I' or 'Me'. You could just say:

    Eating an apple is good for my health.

    Or, if you want to switch up the sentence a bit, you could say:

    For me, eating an apple is good for my health. 

  • 1 month ago

    MY eating that apple...    OR    Eating that apple...

  • 1 month ago

    Neither as far as I was taught. The eating of the apple is not me or I, I might be the doer of the action, so the action belongs to me, is mine, my eating, but if I want to say I am doing it, I do have to use an appropriate subject-verb pair that provides number and time (tense) (I am eating/I was eating).  The gerund (-ing form of the verb being used as a noun) is not a verb so no subject or object pronoun works with it.   You can try, and people do it, but it does not mean what they think it does.  It is simply a bit confusing. 

  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    "My eating that apple is good for my health." "Me" has become acceptable by usage, but "my" is grammatically preferred. "I" is wrong. That said, most speakers would simply say, "Eating that apple is good for my health."

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