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Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Arts & HumanitiesHistory · 2 months ago

Do Spaniards have 'Germanic' blood... if so where exactly does it come from historically or genetically?

5 Answers

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  • 2 months ago

    Many have Celtic, rather than Germanic, bloodlines.  Remember that the Greeks encountered the Celts in modern Spain, and named the peninsula "Keltiberia."  

  • 2 months ago

    No they do not. Spanish people are different from Germans. Every country has its own distinctions. 

  • Ludwig
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    Visigoths, and people like that.

  • Maxi
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    No such thing as 'Germanic blood'... 'Germanic' language, 'Germanic' countries, 'Germanic' culture ..which are mainly Northern Europe

    Europe is a continent so for many centuries have mixed because of conquering by various 'groups' 'some' Spanish 'can be' from Celtic, Germanic, Moors or other groups... you can't discribe a whole country of people of today originating from one grouping

  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    Europe is a relatively small place by world standards. It's also not a place that's particularly difficult to traverse. While it may be true that historically people living on the outer fringes of Europe were less subjected to influence from other peoples, that's hardly true anymore. The border between France and Germany has shifted many, many times. The same is true for the border between Austria and Italy, the border between Germany and Poland and the border between Poland and Russia. There were Romans in Britain, Dutch in Scandinavia, Spaniards in Ireland, even in ancient times this was nothing new. There are very, very few people of relatively "pure" blood anywhere in Europe. That's to be expected in a small place where Finns holiday in Portugal and Romanians are working construction in England and Irish are working in factories in Germany. Many of the modern borders in Europe only came into existence fairly recently. And unlike Americans, Europeans aren't obsessed with their genetic makeup. People whose ancestors immigrated to the UK from Bohemia consider themselves British. Many of the people living in Spain are at least partially descended from the Moorish peoples that were in Spain for years, so it only stands to reason that many Spaniards would have a few drops of other kinds of blood in their veins as well. A better question would be "What difference does it make?" 

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