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Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Science & MathematicsAstronomy & Space · 2 months ago

why can't we fly out and reach a star close up - is our technology that lame, we must suck so bad in that case ?

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  • 2 months ago
    Favorite Answer

    You underestimate our technology. It is the pinnacle of at least two centuries of scientific investigation and technical development. We now understand everything from quarks to quasars and have mastered the fields of propulsion, metallurgy, chemistry and the electromagnetic spectrum. What makes you think that there is anything more to achieve? 

    The cost/benefit ratio alone dictates that we have reached the limit of what can be achieved in any of the sciences except those that are characterised by immense complexity, such as microelectronics, medical science and biochemistry.

    Contrary to vulgar opinion, science tends to limit what we can achieve rather than extending it. Relativity has proven that there is a limit to how fast we can ever fly. In this case the limit is not a financial limit, it is a limit imposed by the laws of nature. No matter how much "technology" we throw at it, or how much energy we expend, it is never possible to go anywhere faster than light can make the journey. Hence even the nearest stars are several years away, even if we devoted the entire industrial output of the world to the problem, which of course we wouldn't.

    But why obsess over stars? We have the technology to explore the microworld virtually without end. This exploration has yielded microelectronics on amazing scales, and the technology is still a little way from it's peak yet. It has provided maps of the genomes of many different species on Earth. Many of these genomes are not yet complete, so further research will come closer to a complete understanding of how the genetic code works and has the potential to cure many afflictions that we endure today. Isn't that amazing enough? Broadening your knowledge will allow you to see that there is more to achievement that what is up in the sky.

  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    We need to evolve longer arms.

  • 2 months ago

    Do you realize how far away the stars are? They are dozens or hundreds or thousands of light years away. 

    If you make a model where the distance from earth to the sun is one inch, the solar system would be the size of a manhole cover. Our farthest spacecraft, Voyager, would be a few years away. The nearest star would be over 4 miles. The center of our Galaxy would be 30,000 miles. Space is big. 

  • 2 months ago

    There are a couple of compounds which remain solid at the temperature of sunspots but anything which could function there would have to be entirely mechanical, and it really is rather beyond the realms of possibility to do that.  Not everything is possible.

  • 2 months ago

    Aside from the Sun, which has been looked close up, the nearest star is Proxima Centauri, which is about 26,000,000,000,000 miles away.  We don't have the tech to examine it close up, but have discovered it has at least two planets

  • Herve
    Lv 6
    2 months ago

    Ever heard of the Helios probes?

    It's not our technology that is lame, but your ignorance.

  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    We can, there are several ships close to our star (the Sun).

  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    are you really that dumb, or just a troll ?

  • 2 months ago

    We can since the closest star is the sun but you’ll be burnt to a crisp before you can get close enough to touch it. 

    What is there to touch. The sun is like a big fireball. You’ll be touching flames. 

  • 2 months ago

    Based on this question, sadly it seems our education system may be lacking, not our technology.

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