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Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Education & ReferencePrimary & Secondary Education · 2 months ago

do you think a 2 and a half hour detention deters bad bahavour as well as to punish the rule breaker ?

on fridays we get let out of school early at 2pm its something that everyone looks forward to, sadly on fridays is my schools most harsh punishment those that have been bad or broke the rules are punished with a 2 and a half hour punishment, on tuesday i had a reguler detention but i couldnt be bothered to go so i went home instead, the next day i was told by my head of hear that on friday i will now have to serve a 2 and a half hour detention, today i had to get my parents to sign the detention slip which also gives us the work we have to do, i have to write a 4 page essay on why its wrong to skip detention, i then have to copy this out making a total of 8 pages, why is detention so harsh ?

8 Answers

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago
    Favorite Answer

    2 & 1/2 hours is a lot. But... If they allow you to do something productive rather than just sit and stare at a wall, I assume it's not too bad. They're just trying to create standards so that everyone doesn't try to become unruly. I would use that time to catch up on some homework.

    I had lunch detentions all the time for being late. I wouldn't say it completely changed my behavior for being late cause I didn't have friends to hang out with at lunch anyway. I just hated the embarrassment of walking into class late, the teacher handing me a detention slip, and everyone in the class is looking at me. That was punishment enough. I'd say that alone did make me a little more mindful, having me rush to school at times to save the embarrassment. I'm sure detentions itself would have done the same if I actually cared about them.

  • d j
    Lv 6
    1 month ago

    So that the students make sure they don't get into it often.

  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    Dude:  can't you figure it out??  It will keep happening if you don't change your ways.

  • drip
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Why so harsh? Because you ignored them the first time.  Because they don’t want you doing it again.

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  • 2 months ago

    Clearly, you are very unhappy about having to stay 2 1/2 hours after school. That's the point of detention. Maybe you'll think better of doing whatever it was that got you into this situation in the first place. I think overall incentives work better than punishment, but when someone refuses to take school seriously, sometimes punishment is the only way to get through to them. Kids used to get paddled at school, or made to stand in the corner in front of the class as punishment. Be happy that you live in a time where all you have to do is sit and write a paper. 

  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    think of it as practice for when you end up in prison . 

  • 2 months ago

    OMG You poor little cupcake. Here is a newsflash~ if you are this tender, this INCAPABLE of dealing with a detention, then please, do us all a favor and do not join the workforce; just stay in the house where your Mommy can still wash your face for you and cut the crusts off your sandwiches. You wll be nothing but a burden to those of us who actually know what it means to be an adult, you will not be capable of dealing with 'adult' issues and the rest of the world will have to carry you because of your inability to cope. Stay home. Please. 

  • 2 months ago

    they hypothesis is yet to be proved, especially in individual cases but the school is willing to try ... [chuckle] ... whether you are or not is mostly immaterial

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