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? asked in Arts & HumanitiesHistory · 2 months ago

Is it possible to imagine something that didn't really happen?

Is it possible that I could've just imagined something very, very bad that happened when I was young and it was all just in my head? 

7 Answers

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    Yes, presently people are destroying nature, killing many animals every where, digging up all mines, polluting air, creating wars and that results in many natural calamites destroying whole earth that would impact the future anger of their creator.

  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    Evidently, Donnie trump and his supporters do it all the time.

  • 2 months ago

    It's possible, but you can see a therapist and they can help you find out.

  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    Especially if in the imagined  view she dropped you on your head.

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    It is equally possible that "forgetting" or suppressing a memory could lead you to believe something did not happen.

  • ?
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    Yep.  False memory syndrome.  

  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    Yes, it is. They're called false memories. 

    False memories can be very vivid and held with high confidence, and it can be difficult to convince someone that the memory in question is wrong. False memories can be the result of a memory evolving over time as it is remembered again and again, changing a little each time. False memories can also be implanted or programmed by others. 

    There is also a phenomenon in which many people share a false memory, the phenomenon commonly being referred to as the Mandela effect, or an instance of the Mandela effect, so named because of many people remembering Nelson Mandela having died in prison in the 1980s, giving rise to the conspiracy theory that the Nelson Mandela who was released from prison in the 1990's, became President of South Africa, and died in 2013 was an imposter. Other examples of the Mandela effect include people swearing they remember that the spelling of the surname of The Berenstain Bears used to be Berenstein; that the Monopoly game mascot, Rich Uncle Pennybags, used to wear a monocle; and that the Lindberg baby was never to be seen or heard from again when, in fact, his remains were found soon after and the autopsy determined he'd been killed by a blow to the head just after being abducted.                                  

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