Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Home & GardenDecorating & Remodeling · 1 month ago

What is the process in rebuilding a burnt home?

Okay so I am new to all this but have some construction background. I am looking at buying a burnt home. It is pretty bad but for the price tag of 8000 for a 4 bedroom home in the city it seems worth it. I don’t have tons of money so I am looking at doing as much of the work myself as possible. Idk where to start permit wise. Ik the first step would be removing all debris and gutting walls ceilings and insulation but someone that’s done this before please give me a little guidance. I have done tons of research already but I wanna hear from people that’s actually done it before. Also if I have to replace roof trusses is that a major thing because some of them are pretty charred up but the home has a new metal roof but some structural roof issues obviously.

Update:

I failed to mention I work in a lumber yard and I know lots of contractors, house builders plumbers, electricians, so that’s why I believe I can save lots of money not hiring out all the work. 

5 Answers

Relevance
  • 4 weeks ago

    You FIRST need to have a meeting with your Building and Zoning LDepartment officials who may actuallywant to see the building to let you know how to proceed. I would not even THINK of moving forward without KNOWING what the town expects to having the house rebuilt up to building codes. Because, remember, the work has to be completed according to current codes.

    I would get the home inspected before buying it so you KNOW what expenses you are in for. Otherwise you could be infor one helluva surprize to find out it is WAY more expensive than you ever imagined!

  • 1 month ago

    There was a season of legendary home restoration tv series "This Old House" which covered this after one of Tom Silva's relatives had a slight mishap with their house. It was Season 21 (link in sources).

    All seasons available to watch on demand on their website, as it doesn't seem to be currently on their YouTube channel.

    For roofing & framing and things, there's a few popular YouTube channels covering this kind of thing including "The Samurai Carpenter" + "Matt Risinger" (and the This Old House tv series has a channel with this kind of stuff too)....

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XMgmLCWEOLA

    Youtube thumbnail

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=beyizqqb9bU

    Youtube thumbnail

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ABqIbKjdl3c

    Youtube thumbnail

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nfIjAeOezsE

    Youtube thumbnail

  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    What I would do is call one of the fire damage restore people and talk to them and have them do the work.  They have crews that can repair/replace what is damaged.   You will not be able to do the work for less than they will charge.  Make a list of the specific work they will do and what they will replace.  Take photos and include the photos in the contract clearly marked what work you are paying for.  Be sure that you include everything that has to be done.  Like rewire the house, plumbing, etc.  The more detail you are, the better the job.  If you leave it up to the contractor to decide, you are going to end up in a bigger disaster.

  • 1 month ago

    I am reminded of a man who was told the property would be worth more if there was not a house on it!

    In the right city and location a vacant piece of land is worth more then one with a house on it.

    I have reworked a lot of old houses and the prospect of gutting one out to rebuild is daunting.

    The last time I saw some one attempt it- they took it down to the foundation and rebuild from there. With the price of dumping materials being what it is, this can run into some bucks real fast. So the first step would be figuring out just how much it is going to cost to get that many tons of waste disposed of.

  • How do you think about the answers? You can sign in to vote the answer.
  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    You are clearly taking on a project that you neither have the means nor the knowhow to pull off. Maybe that house is a good deal... for someone... but most definitely NOT you. 

Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.