Why are long-term couples reluctant to marry?

Marriage offers a lot of financial advantages over remaining single. Since "no fault" divorce is the law [nearly?] everywhere, untangling the relationship isn't so bad even if you do call it quits. Actually, because it's a settled legal process, divorce is probably easier than sorting out an extra-legal arrangement. So why the reluctance?

Update:

Common law marriage is recognized in only a few states and one of its requirements is that the couple tell people they are married, so you don't get CL married simply by keeping house together. Divorce law gives each partner power to force a settlement - the court can impose one. Without marriage, one partner could stall forever. And a spouse has rights when their partner dies or becomes disabled, sick, &c. If you die intestate an unmarried partner gets zilch if their family steps in.

9 Answers

Relevance
  • Anonymous
    4 days ago

    Amongst the longterm unmarried partners I know the majority of the participants lived through their own parents' bitter divorces as children and so have vowed to never marry just for that reason. 

  • Dick
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    Financial "advantage"?    That's some kind of urban legend !!  It cost me almost $2000 a year in additional tax.

  • Foofa
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    Amongst the longterm unmarried partners I know the majority of the participants lived through their own parents' bitter divorces as children and so have vowed to never marry just for that reason. 

  • 2 months ago

    Are you aware of common law marriages? Depending upon the law where you reside,couples who have lived together for a specified time are considered legally married,with all the rights and yes, obligations. 

    You have already acquired your own opinion.  To each his own.   

  • How do you think about the answers? You can sign in to vote the answer.
  • 2 months ago

    If you live in exactly the same way as if you are married then what is the point.  Here we have "de facto" marriage which means that legally there is no difference.  If you act as a married couple then the law treats you as a married couple.

  • g
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    Maybe there's no reluctance, but rather a firm decision that's not what they want.

  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    No fault divorce has NOTHING to do with finances.  No fault divorce most definitely does NOT make it easier to divorce.  The same arguments about assets, debts, spousal support, child support exist with or without no fault divorce.  Don't want that argument if/when you divorce?  Enter into a prenup.

    .

    I find your lack of knowledge ("... because it's a settled legal process, divorce is probably easier than sorting out an extra-legal arrangement") to be astounding.  I'm curious about your experience, research, education on the subject.

    .

    I'm sure each and every couple has its own reasons for not marrying.  If you want to discuss the LEGAL advantages of marriage, outside the FINANCIAL benefits, I was widowed in my late 20's.  My husband died very suddenly in his early 30's.  His mother decided SHE was in charge of his medical treatment, and I had her barred from the hospital.  When he died SHE decided she was in charge of his funeral arrangements.  I was his LEGAL WIFE, so her opinions were immaterial.  If we had NOT been married, his mother (who knew nothing about his last wishes) could have and would have made ALL the decisions.

  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    Should you decide to part - you don't have to get the government/legal system involved.

  • 2 months ago

    Should financial incentives really be a factor when thinking about marriage?

Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.