Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Arts & HumanitiesGenealogy · 2 months ago

Is Ancestry.com accurate?

20 Answers

Relevance
  • Louie
    Lv 5
    2 months ago

    I've been tracing my ancestry for over 30 years & in the past I started a family tree on Ancestry.com. I entered all the names of the people in my family as far a I could remember & asked various older members in my family also. I personally checked the archives & also obtained birth & marriage certificates. After entering all my info, my tree on moms side was up to 438 members (large family) including 2nd marriages & grandchildren having children. Ancestry always gave up notices that I had possible relatives & gave the names of possible ones who usually was not correct but still had  the same last names.  The problem in the US is when folks migrated from Europe or wherever they changed their last names to sort of Americanize them. For instance De Mello was changed to just Mello, also Spanish or Portuguese names were changed to English from the translation. (Blanco which is white, & Moreno which is brown)  When a person whos name is white try's to trace their heritage all the people named white would probably be wrong unless the info indicates it was changed from Moreno.                        Some Latin families carry the fathers & also the mothers name when they name their children. This is still evident today when ever you hear someone's name like  "Jose Rodrigues Garcia", Garcia being the mothers maiden name & Rodrigues being the fathers. Rodrigues would be from the father & Garcia the mom. When these folks have a daughter & she marries, HER children would carry Garcia in moms honor, and the daughter would carry Garcia for the middle name & dads for the last name. This was so confusing for me & most of the information I got from ancestry was incorrect except the ones I actually got on my own. They keep sending me names similar to mine but not related to me at all due to the name changes in the past. So no ancestry is not completely correct. simply my opinion. Rkl.

  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    No. None of them are accurate, at least not for me when compared to my family tree pedigree percentages. And my family tree has over 35,000 people on it and goes back really far on most of my lines (I only have a couple brick walls but those lines still go pretty far back so have an inkling of what they likely are but would be minimal impact on total numbers from what I do know). Plus, I've taken DNA tests with two different commercial testing companies, but neither have been able to get it right yet. E.g., I know I am 38% Scandinavian, and approximately 20% English and 20% Central/Western Europe, along with some other things, but Ancestry.com's first test said I was less than 2% English in their first test. Meanwhile, on FTDNA, they claimed I was 48% English. I remember thinking, gee, if they just split the difference, they both would have gotten it right. I will say, however, that both sites originally had my Scandinavian pretty accurate. However, then they updated them, and now Ancestry.com claims I am 32% English, and FTDNA claims I am 18% English, so FTDNA deleted 20% of my English and Ancestry.com gave me 30% more English. But now both gave me way more Scandinavian also. FTDNA is now claiming I am 65% Scandinavian and Ancestry.com is claiming I am 52% Scandinavian. They should never have messed with those ones, as they both had my Scandinavian right the first time, and was literally the only thing they got right, but now it's wrong, along with everything else. And this is just on two of my ethnicity groups. For my other regions, they are also wildly all over the place. And don't even get me started about the trace regions...

    So in short, I've come to the conclusion that they are just throwing darts at a dart board and have no idea what they're doing.

  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    AncestryDNA is about as good as it gets. It is probably better than Ancestry.com When you submit your DNA you get better results as far as ethnicity, discover/find unknown siblings or that your parent is not your biological parent, etc.

  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    If you are talking about their DNA test, yes, it's pretty accurate.  It's just that people don't know how how to interpret their results.  Keep these 4 things in mind...

    1.  Even though you inherit 50% of your DNA from each parent.  You do NOT inherit 25% from each grandparent.  Your parent passes on an unequal proportion to you.  That means that your mom might pass along more DNA from her mom than from her dad.  So you could have 48% of your DNA from your maternal grandmother and only 2% from your maternal grandfather.  

    That's just an extreme example, but it is possible.  It means if you grandfather was Irish you probably think you are 25% Irish.  But if you only inherited 2% of your DNA from him, then you will only show 2% Irish.  But your sibling might actually show 30% Irish.  

    2.  People have been moving around the globe for thousands of years.  Just because someone is from Ireland and they don't know of any other ancestry, does not mean they are a 100% Irish.  Genetically, the average Polish person, for example, is only 60% Polish.  In Eastern Poland, the people are actually descended from Lithuanians, Ukrainians and Belarusians so many people from Eastern Poland are only 5-10% Polish.

    3.  People often lie in order to cover up ancestries that they do not like or that are in conflict with what they identify with.  Parents from Poland who speak Polish and celebrate Polish culture might never tell their children that their grandparents were actually German.  Sometimes the lies are so far back, no one knows.

    4.  Also, in any scientific testing there is a margin of error between 5-10%.  So any ethnicity that shows up less than 5% on your DNA I wouldn't even consider to be my ethnicity.

    The bottom line is that ethnicity for the most part is made up.  On the last census I put my ethnicity as "American".  People will say, there's no such thing because everyone comes from somewhere else.  But that's true for the entire world, people have been moving around for generations.

    Use your DNA results for fun or as a guide to what you already know.  But don't take it so seriously that you changed how you identify yourself.  To me, your ethnicity is the language you speak, the food you eat, the traditions that you follow and most of all, how people perceive you once you leave your home country.

    If you are an "American" who doesn't identify your ethnicity as "American", you say you are half Italian, 1/4 Irish, 1/4 Swedish, etc.  Ask yourself, if you were travelling to England, France or Italy what would they see you as, how would they call you?  The answer is most definitely "American".

  • How do you think about the answers? You can sign in to vote the answer.
  • 2 months ago

    Not all of the Ancestry.com records are accurate. Official records such as census records, marriage and death certificates, and ship records can be considered accurate, although they are subject to human error and misspellings. But family trees are notoriously inaccurate because they are often pasted together from other people's information, which may itself be inaccurate. When my family tree was public on Ancestry, several people grafted my grandfather (who had a very common Hungarian name) onto their family trees and then gave him wives and children that he never had. Anyone who copies those family trees without verifying the information in them will be copying those errors as well.

  • 2 months ago

    No.  Records are often wrong, trees are often wrong, and ethnicity percentages obtained through DNA testing are often wrong.  I don't know what on Ancestry you meant, but all of it is just a guide and none of it is always accurate.

  • 2 months ago

    They were okay for a couple generations past, but at my great great grandfather level got confused with the wrong person who shared a reasonably common name but wildly different occupation (prison warden versus fisherman!)

  • 2 months ago

    In the main they are correct in their information.

    However, Ancestry.Com can and do make mistakes just like ALL other genealogy sites like Findmypast. 

  • 2 months ago

    No.  I looked at my mother's family.   For her immediate family, Ancestry was about 60% correct.

  • 2 months ago

    Only as accurate as the information provided by the submitters.

Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.