Amber asked in HealthAlternative Medicine · 4 weeks ago

Can a pharmacy purposely give you a different pill manufacturer even when they know its not the same manufacturer that your prescribed? ?

I called walgreens and told them i need to be on the same manufacturer for my thyroid medicine. And even my doctor put a note for this. The pharmacist had a very bad attitude with me while telling her my situation, and now im worried even though on the pill bottle it will say the same manufacturer, cant she actually just put any other manufacturer pill in there, even though it wont actually be the one that it says on the pill bottle. And I cant even tell if its the same manufacturer because the pills look exactly same. How can I tell I’m getting the right one and isn't this illegal? 

9 Answers

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  • 2 weeks ago

    If your doctor says on the script "Brand name only" and the pharmacy gives you generic WITHOUT asking you... THEN SOMETHING IS WRONG WITH THAT PHARMACY!!  And be careful.... GENERIC IS DIFFERENT THAN BRAND NAME!!

    I take Dilantin.  It is medication to control seizures.  When I take Dilantin as it has been prescribed to me, I don't have seizures.  I went to walmart one time to get my prescription filled and when I opened the bottle at home, the pills were purple and white.  NORMALLY, Dilantin is orange and white.  Come to find out the generic pills for Dilantin, ARE FORMULATED DIFFERENTLY THAN BRAND NAME DILANTIN.

    So guess what happened to me???  I had a !@#$&@# seizure from the generic.  Now what formulated means is, how the pill is made.  So let's say in Dilantin, just as an example, the ingredients in Dilantin are Y, Y, SA, and Z.  (this is only an example, I don't know what is in Dilantin, I only know it works for me)

    So for 7 years let's say with Dilantin I have no seizures.  Apparently even getting generic for Dilantin, means that I'm switching medicine, because generic Dilantin isn't the same as Brand Name Dilantin.  Because generic, the ingredients might be the same, the formulation in generic might be Z, Y, SA, Y.  Right there, is a difference.

    Now as far as that pharmacist putting in a different manufacturer in a different labeled bottle, that would be entirely illegal.  If they give you generic for Zoloft, it has to say the generic name of the medicine in the bottle.  They can't say, "okay we're going to fill your Zoloft", put in a generic, and put a label on that says Zoloft.  If they give you ASDFAS in the bottle and not Zoloft, that label HAS to say ASDFAS.

    If your doctor has said "Brand Name only" then the pharmacy SHOULD be filling it Brand Name only.  If they give you generic, stop them and say, um my doctor says I need this Brand Name only, and I know from personally taking Brand Name, I need Brand Name, and the pharmacy should fill Brand Name.

    Just be careful on this medicine business because you can get screwed so easily.  I go to CVS, haven't had a problem yet.  I used to go to Rite-Aid, and they tried to screw me, so I moved to CVS, never looked back.  I know a lot about this because I've been on Dilantin since I was 23 and I'm 43 now.  And Dilantin, you can't just stop taking it, or switch medicines whenever.

  • 2 weeks ago

    It is legal and perfectly alright. I always ask for the generic one because it is cheaper. The ingredients are identical. Drug companies develop medication and other labs copy it. Same medicine but without the expensive brand name. All approved. 

  • 3 weeks ago

    It's not illegal, because it's the same ingredients, just a different manufacturer. It's not a different drug. However, thyroid medications and coumadin are the only 2 medications where different manufacturers can make slight differences in blood serum levels, due to the way the medication is absorbed, due to inactive ingredients, how quickly it disintegrates, the bioavailability of the drug in the stomach. So, generally, every effort should be made to keep people on the same manufacturer for those 2 drugs.

  • 3 weeks ago

    I don't think it's illegal if the medication is listed as the same from other companies. But if you weren't told the brand was different and the doctor specified a certain brand, then it would be unethical for him/her not to tell you. 

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  • Joe
    Lv 5
    4 weeks ago

    If your doctor writes for a specific generic brand the pharmacy has to dispense that brand. It's the same as if the doctor wrote for a brand name drug and signed it do not substitute. 

  • ?
    Lv 7
    4 weeks ago

    You are worried over nothing. A pharmacist will not jeopardize her license and go to jail just cause you may have annoyed her. In the future, only say that you need medicine from the same manufacturer. Nothing else.   . 

  • 4 weeks ago

    With the doctor's permission, the pharmacy can substitute a generic form for the drug prescribed by the doctor.  Otherwise, they have to give you the exact drug the doctor prescribed.  The pharmacist is a Doctor of Pharmacy; he knows his subject, whether or not he is pleasant.  

    I would not worry about it.  Even if the pharmacist has a bad attitude, he's not going to give you the wrong medication.  Some of them just aren't people-friendly.  But doesn't really matter as long as he fills your prescription.  

  • 4 weeks ago

    The regulations allow them to do that. A doctor can specify "brand name only," like writing for Premarin instead of estrogen. But when it comes to generic substitution, that doesn't apply bcuz all makes are supposedly the same (even though we know they're not.) Generic drug makers change so often & supply is never guaranteed, so pharmacies are allowed to interchange them. You can shop around for other pharmacies who might have a more consistent supplier of a particular generic make.

  • ?
    Lv 7
    4 weeks ago

    Chill out!  Stop being paranoid.

    No, legally, if a doctor requires a specific name-brand -- or if a patient rejects the offer of a generic brand of the same medication, the pharmacist will provide the brand requested.

    You should know what your pills look like.  If you don't, take the pills to your doctor and ask them to verify you got the right ones.  There may well be photos online for Levothytroxine or NP Thyroid or whatever it is.  Check what the pill is supposed to look like compared to what you get.

    Alternatively, ask for your prescription back and get it filled somewhere else. 

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