Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Politics & GovernmentLaw & Ethics · 2 months ago

Does a judge need photo evidence or physical evidence.?

I'm reading on a case involving a suspect looking into a window of a child's room which is considered a state jail felony in the state of Texas. This is the suspects first ever recorded arrest, a very great guy in the community just made a mistake and is facing a felony conviction. Right now we believe the only evidence they will have is statement's from witness's, the suspect said he was caught as he was leaving the scene which means he was away from the window at the time and was no longer looking into the window when he was caught. He also mentioned he didn't know it was a kids room. So at this point we believe at this point the only evidence is statement's. The suspect also told us there was a couple of videos of which he recorded of a grown mature women getting dressed from a different location, but in these days Voyeurism is easily accessible on the internet through pornographic websites, I would think its easily defendable as to him saving it from the internet but I'm not 100% sure if that's illegal.  So if he was tried in court right now with only witness statements and no physical or photographic evidence, and those couple videos of he recorded the mature women of a different location which if we defended it as a video he saved from the internet and him not knowing it was illegal. Would the judge potentially dismiss this case without there not being enough evidence? keep in mind this is the guys first time arrest and probably scared him enough not to do it again.

5 Answers

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  • 2 months ago

    So his defense is what?  He was going to rob the house?  They don't need a lot of evidence when he admits he did it.

  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    A judge doesn't need physical evidence and instead can just discern whether or not the witness is telling the truth and examining corroborating evidence.  For example possessing voyeur porn, legal or not, combined with the witness testimony suggest the accused is in fact guilty of the peeping tom offence, but not necessarily with the witness testimony alone, on a first offense.

  • 2 months ago

    You do not know what witness saw.  If witness reported him for looking into a specific window, it is likely that he actually saw him do that.  Those other videos in his possession are a problem.  Even my grandmother could tell the difference between something downloaded from the internet and something created locally.  If he lies, it will be even worse for him. 

    The fact that this is the first time he was caught does not mean it was the first time he did this.

    The plural of statement is statements, not statement's.  The plural of witness is witnesses not witness's.  It is a kid's room not a kids room.

  • 2 months ago

    Your best hope is probation. 

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    This guy is you, isn't it?

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