Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Business & FinanceCareers & EmploymentHealth Care · 2 months ago

Do I suck at being a CNA?

I have been working as a nurse aide for about 6 months and still need help with certain residents. I have not had the class or certification test yet because of covid . I'm sure I made a bad impression when I first started because I have social anxiety and I am extremely shy to the point of being socially awkward . The two CNAs that were suppose to train me just decided they were going to work together which left me as the odd person out. I wasn't about to take care of the residents by myself on the first week with no help so I followed them around and watched as they did the job. When they changed a resident I would try to show that I wanted to help by grabbing pads, briefs whatever they needed . I would also pick up the dirty linen and trash for them and get call lights but I wasn't about to take a floor by myself just starting out . When all of this was going on I was extremely quite . what made it look worse was I just came from a morning shift call center job to night shift CNA so I was extremely tired for the first couple of weeks. Eventually I got the hang of what I was suppose to do and started being more independent but I'm 90ish pounds and can't fight a 200 pound resident to get the changed by myself so I still have to ask for help and when I do I get eyerolls and sighs to the point I don't want to ask for help even if I need it. The CNAs and nurses are treating me like I'm incompetent and lazy  and I don't know why?

1 Answer

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  • n2mama
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    If you haven’t taken the class or certification test yet, then by definition you are not a CNA, since the C stands for “certified”. You basically said that you didn’t know what you were doing and weren’t about to take on work by yourself starting out. Can you not see how others would view that as incompetent (don’t know what you’re doing) and lazy (unwilling to work alone)? And if you are going to use your size as an excuse to not do critical work tasks, then this probably isn’t the right line of work for you. Yes, everyone needs help sometimes, but if you can’t handle a simple task on an average patient alone, then you aren’t much use. And that’s probably why you are treated the way you are at work.

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