Zoom speed? Does zoom affect what we see?

Hi all,

• I am familiar with the fact that when we look at something in space, the further it is, the more we look into past. I understand how it works. Now what confuses me is "Zoom". Could we ever say that zoom is faster than light? Does zoom affect what we see? For example if light travels 10 days from another galaxy to reach us, will zooming help to see it faster and will that mean that with zoom we see more recent events or zoom just intercepts that light midway and provides the same picture but just earlier.

• When we zoom towards a certain star/planet/galaxy, do we zoom into the actual object or we just zoom to an incoming reflection.

• How "far" does zoom actually zoom? This is confusing for me as zooming is not a real physical movement but it still provides a picture like we are very close to those objects.

• Hope you understand my question.

7 Answers

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  • 1 month ago
    Favorite Answer

    >>Zoom speed? Does zoom affect what we see?

    Well, Zoom helps me keep in contact with my guys, most of whom are working from home now. Or... they're *at* home, I guess, I'm not really sure if they're working...

    >>Hi all, 

    Hi there!

    >>I am familiar with the fact that when we look at 

    >>something in space, the further it is, the more we

    >>look into past.

    Very true.  It takes time for light to get from one place to another, the longer the distance, the more time it takes.

    >>I understand how it works. Now what confuses me is "Zoom".

    It gets me sometimes too... I hate it when it freezes. 

    >>Could we ever say that zoom is faster than light? 

    Nope. Nothing is faster than light. 

    >>Does zoom affect what we see? For example if light travels 

    >>10 days from another galaxy to reach us, 

    Most galaxies are millions of light years away; heck - the closest *star* besides the Sun is 4 light years away - so, it takes that long for it's light to reach us.. we're seeing Alpha Centauri *as it was* 4.3 years ago, because that's how long it took for the light leaving AC to reach us...

    >>will zooming help to see it faster and will that mean 

    >>that with zoom we see more recent events or zoom 

    >>just intercepts that light midway and provides the 

    >>same picture but just earlier. 

    Well, no... first, maybe we're talking two different kinds of "Zoom", but... it's still going to take some amount of time for the image to reach us.  The largest scopes that can magnify an image the greatest are *still* looking at light that is years, decades, and centuries old.  And older.  Again - what you stated above is true - the further away something is, the further back in the past we're looking at it. 

    A good example is the Andromeda Galaxy... it's 2.3 *million* light years away from us - and, pretty as it is, we're seeing what Andromeda looked like 2.3 million years ago. 

    >>When we zoom towards a certain star/planet/galaxy, do we

    >>zoom into the actual object or we just zoom to an incoming 

    >>reflection. 

    Do you mean magnify?  With our naked eye, we can see Jupiter is bright in the sky... with a telescope, we can see that it's disk, and 3 or 4 of it's largest moons, and perhaps even the different bands of clouds on it's surface.... Although we've magnified the image, it still took about an hour for it's reflected Sunlight to finally reach us - we're simply magnifying the image; but it's still seeing Jupiter as it was about an hour ago, the same as when you look with your eye. 

    >>How "far" does zoom actually zoom? This is confusing for me 

    >>as zooming is not a real physical movement but it still provides

    >>a picture like we are very close to those objects. 

    You should read about telescope optics and resolution... The telescope you look for is not any closer to the object than you are, but it's light-gathering ability is far superior to the the eye.  A telescope that's 10 inches in diameter means you'll have almost 80 square inches of light-gathering ability; that light is then focused with lenses to see a magnified image.  So, the image appears larger to you, but the image you see is light that's the same age as the light you see with you eye.  It's traveled the same distance.

    >>Hope you understand my question.

    I'm not sure I have...  but, hope I helped. 

  • Robert
    Lv 5
    1 month ago

    Sometimes people use the expressions that "zoom pulls in distant objects" but this is really just a poorly phrased expression. Zoom doesn't change ANYTHING about your location or the objects location so its not making far away things closer to you. Its simply enlarging the same light that has already reached you to make it appear bigger.

  • 1 month ago

    Zooming is not movement but magnification.  Incidentally, the idea of another galaxy being only ten light days away is a phenomenal miscalculation of scale.

  • 1 month ago

    "Zoom" is simply a magnification of the image presented to our eyes and at our eyes?

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  • 1 month ago

    You gotta be kidding me.. Are you saying telescopes don't zoom?

  • 1 month ago

    Astronomers and astrophysicists and cosmologists don't deal with "zoom".  Photographers and video conference chatters on Internet do.

  • Nyx
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    In astronomy usage, 'zoom' is meaningless.

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