Bob asked in Science & MathematicsPhysics · 1 month ago

what was the make of steve mcqueens car in the blob?

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    1953 Plymouth Cranbrook Convertible

    It was a coupe, but since Plymouth didn't manufacture the sedan with a convertible option but only the coupe, "coupe" isn't actually part of the name of the 1953 Cranbrook Convertible, though it is sometimes added to descriptions of that model just to make it clear to those who don't know that the word "Convertible" in its model name automatically designates it as a coupe (two-door) and not a sedan (four-door). 

    Now that doesn't mean you won't see descriptions that read "1953 Plymouth Cranbrook Sedan Convertible" or won't see a 1953 Plymouth Cranbrook Sedan with a convertible top. It's just that the word "convertible" in those cases isn't actually part of the model name since Plymouth didn't manufacture any convertible sedans. They nonetheless do exist, though, because it was extremely common in the 50's for car buyers to take hardtop cars they bought that they couldn't get from the factory as a convertible to a local body shop and have it's hardtop cut off and an after-market convertible top installed in its place, which is what the word "convertible" is describing in such cases and why the word "Sedan" appears beforehand and "convertible" appears afterward as "Sedan" is actually part of the model name and the word "convertible," which really should always have a lowercase C when it comes to a 1953 Plymouth Cranbrook Sedan since "convertible" is not part of the model name, even though it doesn't in actuality always appear with a lowercase C, and which is why it should always appear after "Sedan" instead of beforehand as inserting it before "Sedan" breaks up the actual model name by inserting a common adjective that isn't part of the name, though, again, that doesn't always happen but really should because it becomes misleading as people may infer that its convertible stop is stock and so not realize that it's actually not worth as much as a stock Sedan since the aftermarket top makes it no longer stock and so not worth as much as a collector, a real danger since such misleading isn't legally actionable as the buying and selling of used cars is "caveat emptor" (i.e., let the buyer beware) and so sellers of used cars can say and print whatever they want, true or not, to entice someone to buy their car and are not legally bound to what they've said or advertised unless those words are put within sales contract itself before the buyer and seller sign it and money and car changes hands.

    Steve McQueen's car in that movie, though, was a stock 1953 Plymouth Cranbrook Convertible.

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