Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Politics & GovernmentLaw & Ethics · 1 month ago

Ct inheritance laws?

I’m not that familiar yet when my grandmother died she had a living will and that helped us navigate the estate I’m the third child of the family but personally see myself being the best suited for being appointed executor or whatever we call it here. The issue was a dui a year ago. Will that stand in the way?

Update:

And a trust sorry to miss 3 words. Jesus lol 

6 Answers

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  • 1 month ago

    A Living Will has nothing to do with the appointment as an executor and nothing to do with the assets of the deceased.  You don't get to decide who the executor is.  Your grandmother chose one, plus and alternative if that one was dead or could not fulfill the duty.  A dui will not prevent you from taking the position of executor IF she chose you to be it.  However, if the chosen is not doing a good job and the heirs want another one chosen, your dui could prevent you from the court deciding who will replace the existing executor.

    Source(s): Certified Paralegal, with 25+ years' experience & with Wills & Estates law experience.
  • 1 month ago

    Your information CANNOT be accurate. A living will deals with your wishes regarding medical care. It has NOTHING to do with your estate. Merely using the term living will in this context shows that even if you are the best suited in the family, you ARE NOT qualified to handle the estate.

    Neither your DUI or your birth order are relevant. I STRONGLY recommend consulting an attorney, because this question suggests NO ONE in the family should be executor.

  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    You might want to look up "living will."  The "living will" is invalidated after death.  Perhaps you're not "best suited" for the job.  The better question is why do you want to be executor?

  • 1 month ago

    You are either named the executor in the will or you are not.  The will normally already has named someone.  A living will only applies when she is alive.  It applies to medical decisions should she become unable to make them.  A living will does nothing once she is dead.

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  • 1 month ago

    A “living will” doesn’t have information about the estate. It is a document that talks about when your grandmother wanted to die. Usually something like “do-not-resuscitate” after a heart attack. 

    A DUI doesn’t automatically disqualify you ... but if somebody objects, they can certainly bring it up. If the whole family agrees to having you as executor, then you shouldn’t have a problem.

  • 1 month ago

    If you are the best suited with a dui that says a lot for the others. You didn't mention if there is any other candidate holding that position or why you would be best for the job.

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