D asked in Science & MathematicsPhysics · 1 month ago

Physics Trampoline?

What force does a trampoline have to apply to a 43.0–kg gymnast to accelerate her straight up at 7.30 m/s2? Note that the answer is independent of the velocity of the gymnast–she can be moving either up or down, or be stationary.

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  • 1 month ago
    Favorite Answer

    Resolving vertically and using F = ma we have:

    F - mg = ma

    so, F = m(g + a)

    Then, F = 43(9.8 + 7.3) => 735 Newtons

    :)>

  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    There are two forces on the gymnast when she is in contact with the trampoline: her weight (mg) and the force from the trampoline (T).  Resultant force F = T + mg.

    Using F = ma gives: T + mg = ma

    T = ma - mg = m(a - g)

    Taking up as positive, down as negative gives:

    T = m(a - g) = 43.0(7.30 - (-9.81)) =736N (upwards).

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