Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Education & ReferenceTeaching · 1 month ago

Longshot, but is anyone on here a bilingual or ESOL teacher?

So basically, I need to interview a bilingual or ESOL teacher for a school project. It's only 5 questions and answers don't need to be crazy long. My problem is, I don't know any ESOL teachers!! So I figured I'd throw it out here and see if anyone can answer my questions. If it doesn't work, I'll let my professor know about my situation. 

1. Would you say that bilingual/ESOL education has changed over the past 5 years? If yes, how so?

2. Currently, what type (dual-language, monolingual, etc.) of bilingual/ESOL education program is implemented in your district? Would you say it is effective?

3. What role does technology play in your classroom?

4. What can the United States education system do better to support ESOL/bilingual students today?

5. How does society currently view bilingual/ESOL students? Is the assimilation of bilingual/ESOL still encouraged today?

If you do answer my questions, I just want to say thank you so much. Also, if you feel comfortable, could you share which state you work in? Thanks!!

1 Answer

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  • Expat
    Lv 6
    1 month ago
    Favorite Answer

    Yes, I am a ESL/EFL professor in Japan and have been teaching for the last 22 years. I'll answer your questions for you.

    1. Would you say that bilingual/ESOL education has changed over the past 5 years? If yes, how so?

    In the last 5 years? No, not so much. It has in the last 20 years with the advent of so many resources and tools online. 

    2. Currently, what type (dual-language, monolingual, etc.) of bilingual/ESOL education program is implemented in your district? Would you say it is effective?

    In Japan the government does support English education and has lowered the entry age of required English education from Junior High to 3rd grade elementary school. Is it working? That remains to be seen. For many years Japan focused on a "grammar translation" style of English education that focused on grammar and reading, but not speaking and listening, and for many years even some teachers could not speak or listen to English with any proficiency. This has changed, and speaking and listening are more included, but it is still not at any measure that English could be considered a 2nd language of the Japanese. 

    3. What role does technology play in your classroom?

    Well, since COVID-19, all of my classes at my university are online, so technology is a vital aspect. Prior to the pandemic technology was largely limited to word processing software, online translation dictionaries and online exercises available with some textbooks. 

    4. What can the United States education system do better to support ESOL/bilingual students today?

    Make ESL classes, especially in elementary school and junior high be "all English" and not taught in Spanish, as many schools tend to do. I worked at a public elementary school as a special education teacher before teaching in Japan, and the ESL class was taught primarily in Spanish even though the class had students from more than 10 different countries with students who spoke more than 6 different first languages. It was really only focused on helping Spanish speakers, even having them write poems in Spanish, and it alienated students from other language backgrounds. 

    5. How does society currently view bilingual/ESOL students? Is the assimilation of bilingual/ESOL still encouraged today?

    Society is difficult to define when it comes to their attitudes about things especially things that cost money and use tax dollars. I think in theory they want all children to be able to speak English, but they don't want to pay for it because many see it as funding not going to their children. 

    I hope these answers help. Good luck! 

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