Anonymous

Was it wrong that I told my client he was not being honest with me?

We agreed on certain work for me to do, but then he kept giving me more beyond what we agreed upon and kept saying it is the final work each time, was it rude to tell him he is not being honest with the work he wants?

11 Answers

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  • Raja
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    When he kept on changing the scope of work you should have revised the original estimate and given him a revised estimate .You have failed to do that but simply carried on the work .In this case a question of honesty does not arise if he has paid the originally agreed fee. You have simply carried on the work like an obedient servant. As a contractor how competent you are in pricing and estimating is questionable  .When that is the case you are wrong for telling him that he is not honest .

  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    No it wasn't. Especially if he thinks that you'll do it all for the first agreed upon price. Let him know that you'll have to charge more for the added on requests. 

  • 1 month ago

    Saying he is dishonest is a bit of a loaded statement. 

    You could have just said that you will charge a surcharge for the things he is expecting that go beyond the scope you agreed on.

  • 1 month ago

    I wouldn't say it's "wrong" per say but usually in these types of situations most would offer to do so for an increased amount of pay since you're doing more work than agreed upon. If you're not willing to do more work with increased pay, I'd see how saying this would be the appropriate action. I could see how this may insult someone but really it was more rude of him to expect you to do extra work for free.

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  • adam
    Lv 5
    1 month ago

    ever heard of writing up a CONTRACT that specifies the work to be done? 

  • Alan H
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Perhaps the terminology could be wiser

  • ?
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    In most cases the appropriate response would be to tel the client that if he's adding on to the original scope of the work it'll raise the price of that work. Overages like this exist in pretty much every field from home construction to web design to cosmetic surgery. 

  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    You are confusing your personal and business life.

    Your contract - and it can be an oral contract - very specifically outlines what tasks you will perform and what you will be paid.  Changes are addressed in writing (or, occasionally, by oral agreement).

    So when he adds work, amend the contract to cover your fees/expenses/pay.

  • T J
    Lv 6
    1 month ago

    Tell him its not the agreement, and that your fee is going to be higher.

  • 1 month ago

    So just charge him a good bit extra since he's taking up a lot of your time. 

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