Anonymous
Anonymous asked in HealthDiseases & ConditionsCancer · 2 months ago

My doctor won’t test me for colon cancer, should I get a second opinion ?

My doctor won’t test me specifically for colon cancer. I’m 36 and no history. I had blood work done and he said no markers were elevated for him to suspect anything. 

He said it’s very rare to have it at your age, chalked my symptoms to IBS. 

And, said I should take anti-anxiety medicine 

9 Answers

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  • 1 month ago

    I would. I just posted a question on here myself. I am a 23 year old male and just got my fourth colonoscopy today. They found second large precancerous polyp in my colon that could have turned into cancer. Again, I am only 23- if I waited until I was 40, who knows how many precancerous polyps I would have and if I would even still be alive. Thank god my doctor suggested I got my first colonoscopy 4-5 years ago. All of this being said, I would definitely push for getting a colonoscopy/endoscopy ASAP. It can’t hurt and if anything will save you from something worse. 

  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    You need to find another doctor. Just because you have no markers in your blood doesn't mean squat when it comes to colon cancer. And NO, you aren't too young to get this disease. The fastest growing demographic group for new CRC cases is among young adults ages 21 to 40, and it has been that way for a couple of decades now. And because people like this doctor you went to think that it's a disease of old age, a lot of younger adults aren't getting screened for it, even when they are symptomatic. Add in the fact that most young adults don't even want to see the doctor for symptoms (nobody likes admitting that they are bleeding from their butt) and you have a recipe for tragedy. Because the end result of this trend is that younger adults with colon cancer are getting diagnosed at later stages of the disease, when it is much harder to treat. This in turn has lowered their overall survival rate by a large margin.

    Your doctor shouldn't have been so quick to dismiss your symptoms as IBS. Sudden diarrhea or constipation in someone who has no prior history of it is a warning sign, especially if it lasts for a period of greater than 4 weeks.So is passing stools that are black (and by that I mean the color of anthracite coal, not just merely dark brown) and which may or may not have fresh blood on them.  Passing stool that is extremely narrow or ribbon like is another sign that something is wrong, as is having repeated episodes of what is called "urge incontinence"- that is, feeling like you still need to poop even though you just had a BM, or feeling as though you can never empty your rectum completely. Still other signs of colon cancer include unexplained weight loss (of greater than 10 pounds without changing your diet or exercise routines) unusual or unexplained fatigue, being unable to finish a normal sized meal (early satiety) and in extreme cases, repeated bouts of vomiting. Vomiting can be a symptom if there's a tumor that's big enough to block the colon.

    The main way colon cancer is diagnosed is through colonoscopy. But due to your age, you may have trouble getting your insurance company to cover the cost, and this procedure is expensive. The average colonoscopy costs between $1,500 and $3,000, depending on where it is done and by whom. Procedures performed at a hospital tend to cost more than those performed at an outpatient practice, so shop around. And while you're looking, find out what the credentials of the provider(s) are. Doctors who are Board Certified will have higher fees, due to their having had more education and training. You may also want to find out if other procedures are performed during the colonoscopy, such as polypectomy or polyp removal.

  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    Well, the test for Colon Cancer is getting a colonoscopy. If you want one without a prescription it will cost you several thousand dollars, plan on about $5000. 

    Since it takes at least 6 years of full time study to become a doctor and if they want to specialize as gastroenterologists it's another 5 years. If your doctor isn't a gasteroenterologist, I don't know if seeing one is advisable for IBS. But really at some point you need to decide you trust your doctor. 

    But if you have seen this doctor for a while I would recommend that you follow your doctor's advice. Ask your doctor about getting some anti-anxiety medication. 

  • 2 months ago

    If you are still unhappy or worried about any health issue after seeing a doctor then for your own peace of mind ask for a second opinion .

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  • k w
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    IBS is due to MILK, just go to [ notmilk dot com ] and look for IBS, why do you think the doctors never told you ?

  • Mike G
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    Insurance will not cover that, so I guess you are willing to pay out-of-pocket?

  • Tavy
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    NO, not at your age. There is no pain with colon cancer but dark red blood. Most of us have IBS at some point in our lives.

    A Colonoscopy is not a pleasant procedure, the meds you take beforehand are horrendous. I have had it.

  • mokrie
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    Go for a colonoscopy. Any doctor can recommend names of other doctors that specialize in that. 

  • Matt
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    very, very rare to get colon cancer before 50 unless you have family history - i think  your doctor is correct

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