Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Pregnancy & ParentingOther - Pregnancy & Parenting · 2 months ago

Implanon and implantation bleeding? ?

I’ve been using the birth control implanon a few years now and I’m on my second one. I do panic about it sometimes but I started to finally believe it is effective and a lot doctors have said to me it’s the best. 

I had unprotected sex on the 21st 28th September . 3rd 4th October my breast became sore and tender and I started cramping. I have irregular periods and when do come they can be very light or the blood can be very dark . I started bleeding really dark blood which last 3-4 days. 

The breast pain stopped for day but started again and they feel much fuller than usual. 

If I hadn’t the breast pain I probably wouldn’t think I’m pregnant. Was that implantation bleeding that had occurred? Il be amazed if I am pregnant as I finally started to trust the implanon. I took a test and said negative but I think was probably too early. 

Any help?? 

1 Answer

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    Implantation bleeding is a few DROPS of blood that release when the egg attaches to the uterine wall.  DROPS - not flow - not days - DROPS.  You would only see implantation bleeding when you wipe - if you even see it at all.  The body often absorbs it before it makes it out and you never see it.

    At 21 days after sex, a test is accurate.  If you are having sex more often than that, then at 7 days after what you thought was implantation bleeding, a test would be accurate.  

    The implant is the best method because you don't need to remember to take anything.  The only thing you need to know is if there are any medications that might make your implant less effective.  Ask your doctor about that and make sure that if you ever use any of those medications, you use a back up protection during that time frame.  The medications that affect birth control are certain types of PRESCRIPTIONS - so unless a doctor gives it to you, there aren't things you could buy and use over the counter that would reduce the effectiveness of your birth control.   

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