Job advice please?

I work at a retail store and have been working there for over 5 years. I recently was asked if I would like to transfer to another store for a promotion for which I'd be making almost $20 an hour but would have to drive an hour there and an hour back every day but I'd be management. Do you think driving that every day is too much or should I decline the offer? Any input is appreciated. I'm just torn between taking it and not 

Update:

I currently make $16.50 but am not a manager. I live in the Midwest so we do have some days during the winter where driving can be difficult

Update 2:

My car gets 36 mpg and the drive would be mostly highway with no tolls 

7 Answers

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  • Jane
    Lv 7
    3 weeks ago

    Congratulations on the offer of promotion, the company must believe you have potential and I hope this makes you feel confident in your abilities! Thing is, do you see yourself making a career within this company? If yes, then this move would be a good investment- tough at first but perhaps a next step up the ladder.

    If not, look around to see if there are other opportunities in your area that would make good use of your skills, experience and strengths. Time to review these- I reckon you might underestimate yourself.

  • 3 weeks ago

    That's a lot of driving.  You're talking about 10 hours out of our life every week.  If you have no option to move closer to the job, I'd think long and hard about it. If you could move closer, then I'd look into that.  If being at the new store is a "permanent" assignment, you really need to consider relocating to be closer to that store.

    If you work 40 hours per week, 50 weeks a year, the increase is $7K before taxes. How does the extra gas and wear & tear on you and your car compare to the increase?  

    Some people don't mind a longer commute and use the time to listing to books or practice a foreign language, or call their parents or friends.  Other people really begin to hate it, particularly in the winter where you could be coming and going in the dark and in poor weather conditions.  

  • Maxi
    Lv 7
    3 weeks ago

    You have been offered a management job however can't make a decision about taking it or not, you are not able to work out basic costs of travel or make a decision about time spent driving........... my advice is remain where you are as moving you will have to make many decision some very difficult ones on your own and those decisions will affect other staff and their jobs and this shows you you are not very good at it

  • Anonymous
    3 weeks ago

    Auto decline. DO NOT drive an hour one way to work everyday unless you plan on moving closer either temporarily or permanently. Especially for a retail job and especially if you work 12+ hour days. There are only 24 hours in a day, honey. Do the calculations. Don't push the limits.

    1 hour drive each way to work everyday = 22 hours left.  

    8 hours of sleep (which you probably won't get because you're unable to sleep after being in "go-mode" at work for 12 hours) = 14 hours left.  

    12 hour work day = 2 hours left. 

    1 hour spent eating breakfast, taking a shower, getting dressed, etc and getting ready for work in the morning = 1 hour left.  

    I'm sure the 1 hour of free time you have left in the day will quickly be whittled away to nothing by some trivial thing like the time spent waiting in traffic.I've already been there, done that. Been so tired that bad situations have happened as a result of being burnt out and not paying attention. You'll end up hating your life and regretting it.  The benefit of that extra $3.50/hr you'll make will be eaten up by the additional hotel room expense you now have to take on because traveling an hour back and forth to work everyday is wearing you down.

    Also management isn't for everyone so it's a risky proposition.  It may not work out for you and then you're screwed.

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  • Pearl
    Lv 7
    3 weeks ago

    you could always take the offer and move there

  • 3 weeks ago

    Not enough info. How much do you make now? How many miles per gallon does your car get?  Do you pay tolls? Do you have bad winters? 

    If there is a layoff usually the higher paid employees are let go first.

    Update- If your gas bill is going to be say $15 daily round trip, $75 weekly, $300 monthly, maybe you can rent a room in a house nearby your new job and go home on weekends? I did that once to save wear and tear on my car and myself!

  • 3 weeks ago

    1 hour is a long way.  It also is a big step up in your career.  5 years at 'retail' seems like you're probably pretty stale in pay with little chance for advancement where you're at.  Being a manager can get you out of retail if desired or get you to the next level at the company.  Both of which will me more long term earning potential.  Is this important to you (both in pay and in advancement?)  Where do you want to be 5-10 years from now?  The pay you mention means nothing since don't know what you currently get paid or what a good wage is for that company in your local market.  

    Personally, I would be discussing with them what this means 1, 2, or 5 years from now.  What is the path after this?  If there were an opportunity for the same or higher level back at your current location would you be considered?  How do they come up so that you don't miss out?  

    --edit--

    Your additional info doesn't help even for a pure financial standpoint.  "an hour" at 36mpg says nothing.  If this is the important part to you, then figure out about how much your commute costs you today and then compare it against what it will cost you.  1 hour is.....45 miles?  So 90 round trip which would generally be a little under 3 gallons of fuel (at 36mpg).  (just really round numbers).  If your commute time is worth nothing to you and your career advancement/experience means nothing to you, then it just becomes that simple math problem.  If there's more to it, then everything else I mentioned comes into play.

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