Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Consumer ElectronicsOther - Electronics · 2 months ago

Can an outlet’s electrical output be too powerful for a device?

I think I recently noticed that a lamp bulb was brighter when plugged into the top part of an outlet versus the bottom. Also besides surge protectors what can one use to protect one’s device? Is there something that one can plug into an outlet then plug their device into but adjusting the voltage that is required? 

10 Answers

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  • Anonymous
    3 weeks ago

    Best Unionwell micro switch https://unionwellvietnam.com/

  • 1 month ago

    A residential dual receptacle wired correctly will have the same voltage at both plug connections.

    Remember, larger appliances sometimes use 240V AC, the above method would be the same but in this case, the voltage would be greater.

    However, appliances (motor's) generally use a single twist-lock plug or wired directly. 

    The above is standard NEC practice that must be adhered to. 

  • 2 months ago

    No.  Electrical devices like plug-in lamps are designed to work at 120 volts and they will draw the necessary current.

    There can be wiring problems that cause high resistance connections - although what you are seeing on that outlet is probably just dirty contacts.

  • bill
    Lv 5
    2 months ago

    What kind of bulb is it? I used to buy heavy duty 'farmer' incandescent bulbs for my house because it had 'dirty' electricity.

    I used to lose many bulbs due to surges but that fixed it.

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    Only if the supply voltage differs between the top and bottom parts of the outlet could that happen, or if there is a problem in that whole outlet.   Have you tried plugging the lamp into other outlets around the house?

    If it looks same brightness in all other outlets, you should get an electrician to check that outlet, and others for comparison.

    Do not buy any form of surge protector or dimmer etc before that outlet is checked.

  • 2 months ago

    No. 

          

    Each appliance consumes only what it needs from the available supply.    

         

    Think of it this way: It's like you drinking from a large river.   

    There is no way you could or would consume all of the water passing by your location; 

    you would take only a tiny portion of the flow. 

  • 2 months ago

    BECAUSE THE BOTTOM SOCKET CONTACTS WERE RUSTY OR LOOSING THAT GENERATE HIGH RESISTANCE BETWEEN THE PLUG AND SOCKET, MADE THE LIGHT DIMMER.

    AS YOU PLUG A 1000W HEATER INTO THE BOTTOM RUSTY SOCKET, IT SHALL HEAT UP QUICKLY ON PLUG OR EVEN BURNING INTO FIRE.

  • khalil
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    you should measure their voltages .... maybe one 220v and the other 240v ....

    you may use a VARIAC

    https://www.popsci.com/diy/article/2009-10/what-va...

  • P
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    The primary concern is your outlet may be dangerously damaged if it's not consistent which can cause an electrical fire.  A power conditioning device may be able to help with the voltage, but the ultimate underlying danger of fire would still remain.  

    That said so many devices these days are already setup to accept variable voltage for international usage it's not as much as a concern as it used to be.  You can tell if your device is variable be looking for a "100v-240v" note on it.  However there is some equipment that is more sensitive and you can purchase "power conditioners" or different APC battery backup systems that will monitor the line voltage and take various measures when the voltage falls out of line.  The power conditioners that work well can be very expensive so you really need to understand if your equipment needs that level of protection before spending the money.

  • 2 months ago

    If you have a dual outlet and a lamp bulb is brighter in one than in the other, the outlet is faulty.  Get it changed.  The voltage on the supply cable is fixed.  If an outlet, or part of it, drops the voltage it's faulty and a fire risk.

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