Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Science & MathematicsAstronomy & Space · 2 months ago

In the very advanced future can sun be artificially inflated with hydrogen to keep it going forever?

Suppose humans still exist after 100,000 years and they are now very scientifically and technologically advanced species. 

By then would they be able to add hydrogen to sun so that it remains main sequence star forever

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  • 2 months ago
    Favorite Answer

    Very few people realize that our Sun will only use up ~10% of its Hydrogen during its entire lifetime. Therefore, the Sun will not "run out of Hydrogen", (contrary to popular belief.). The problem might instead be, (if it is a problem) is that the Sun's core accumulates more and more Helium over time, and this Helium makes the core get denser and denser, which in turn makes Hydrogen fusion become faster and faster, causing our Sun to slowly increase in luminosity. Eventually, the Sun's core becomes so hot and so increasingly dense that Helium fusion to Carbon-Nitrogen-Oxygen begins, which causes our Sun to blow up into a red giant, which should happen in ~4-5 Billion years from now. It may also blow off a "planetary nebula" at that time, which would cause all of our 8 planets to crash into our Sun. So in short, the problem is not too little Hydrogen, but instead it is too much Helium. 

    So if you want to save our Sun, the best thing would be to remove its Helium ash as it is formed, which would allow our Sun to remain on the main sequence essentially forever, or until it has lost so much mass (from Helium removal) that it becomes a "brown dwarf", many many many Trillions of years from now. 

    Cheers. 

  • John P
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    Probably not, but let us leave that worry to scientists in about 4 billion years time.

  • 2 months ago

    Sure, that is possible. But where would you get that much hydrogen from? 

  • 2 months ago

    Your timeline is askew; the Sun will become uninhabitable for Earth life in roughly a billion years... then another 3 billion of it going red giant before it sheds itself. If you add hydrogen the entire time, all you're going to do is increase it's eventual density and speed up the process. If you add enough, you'll trigger a supernova... and then the entire idea is pointless.

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  • cosmo
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    In 100,000 years the Sun will still be very much like it is now, and still a couple billion years away from stellar death.

  • 2 months ago

    Oh, that's not what you want to do... add mass to the Sun (or, any star), and it only burns hotter and faster. 

    Instead, what you'd want to do is *remove* mass... A red dwarf star may burn for up to a *trillion* years, but as you get more and more massive, the 'life' of a star on the Main Sequence gets shorter and shorter. 

    Ideally, you'd want to remove as much of the helium build-up in the core, and replace that mass with hydrogen, keeping the sun's overall mass about the same; that would keep it going for a longer time, but.... *how* that could be done (and, what you would do with the excess helium, and where you'd get that much hydrogen), I have no idea...

  • 2 months ago

    Why do you assume that the future holds scientific advancement? All evidence suggests that advancement reaches a peak then either stays level or falls into decline.

    For every Jetsons episode there is a Flintstones episode. For an antidote to Star Trek, I would suggest watching a few Mad Max films. That might open your mind to a more varied assessment of the future.

    You can safely assume that the sun is safe from our tampering.

  • Quato
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    No I don't think that's feasible, but assuming civilization exists and we didn't wipe ourselves out we'd probably be living on other planets by then, even the voyager probe moving at low speed would reach another star long before that.

  • 2 months ago

    We won't be around for that long.

  • Elaine
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    It's not possible.  Fusion of hydrogen into helium takes place in the sun's core. Since helium is heavier than hydrogen gravity pulls the helium into the centre of the core.  This will eventually result in a helium core with a hydrogen shell surrounding it.  Since helium requires a much higher temperature to fuse into oxygen the hydrogen shell expands and is eventually blown away.  

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