Question about tracking mileage for tax deductions for door dash?

So when i'm dashing, do I stop tracking my mileage after my last delivery? Or can I also count the mileage of me driving from my last delivery to my house

7 Answers

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  • John
    Lv 6
    1 month ago

    From Mercedes: "You will have to pay about 14% of your profit as self-employment tax."  From A Hunch: "Mercedes is incorrect. Self employment tax is 15.3%"

    Mercedes is correct.  The formula for self-employment tax is: Profit x 92.35% x 15.3%.  That equals 14.13%

  • Judy
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Miles from your house to your first pickup , and your last delivery back to your home, are not deductible.

  • A
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    count every mile that you are driving for the job.

  • 1 month ago

    When you leave a property, you do not track mileage until you have another delivery.  If you randomly drive around - not a tax deduction.  If you drive to a parking lot and sit - not a tax deduction.

    When you leave a property and drive home - not a tax deduction. 

    You receive mileage tax deduction from when you accept a delivery, until the delivery is finalized.

    Mercedes is incorrect.  Self employment tax is 15.3%. 

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  • 1 month ago

    While you are at it, estimate how much you are really making.  I suspect you will be shocked to find out how little it really is. Check with your auto insurance agent to make sure you are covered for business mileage.  You will have to pay about 14% of your profit as self-employment tax.

  • 1 month ago

    You stop track "work" mileage at the last delivery.  You do not count mileage to your house as work.  However, you do track it and report it separately as commuting.

  • danxp2
    Lv 6
    1 month ago

    Stop tracking after your last delivery. The drive from your last delivery to your home is treated like anyone driving from an office to home. It is the return part of a commute and not deductible for income tax purposes.

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