The corona virus mortality rate is 0.1% (ridiculously low) how low does it have to be to justify not wearing masks anymore and reopening?

Update:

That is the mortality rates you morons, it's less for the flu

Update 2:

@Anon Lmao no it's not, learn to look at accurate sources

Update 3:

@bflowing, are you an idiot? Theres no cure for many infectious diseases

Update 4:

@Curtis it's 0.1%, many have had it you dope, most are asymptamatic anyways so even lower

17 Answers

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  • 2 months ago
    Favorite Answer

    0.1% is the best estimate for the average chance of death for an infected person across the entire population.  0.1% will be the total mortality rate per infection if we keep doing what we're doing.

    It will be even lower than that if we just went back to normal, while the elderly and vulnerable protect themselves.  It would ensure that the 70% total infection rate necessary for herd immunity is comprised of young and healthy people who won't die from the virus.

    You're correct about the mortality rate, but you make a mistake in assuming that a low mortality rate is necessary to "justify reopening."  Reopening will make the mortality rate, and the total number of deaths, LOWER, not higher.  And that's only counting coronavirus deaths, not even accounting for all the deaths from suicide, poverty, depression, etc. which will result from forcing people to be unemployed and under house arrest.

  • John
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    Ah, the "I saw it on TV epidemiologist" spews.....

  • J
    Lv 6
    2 months ago

    That is the mortality rate of the flu, not covid. It’s closer to 4% for covid. It may be less, since our testing is seriously lacking, but it’s not even close to the number you gave. Try checking your facts. 

  • NiJo
    Lv 6
    2 months ago

    Wear the mask, it doesn't hurt. Vehemently object to further lock downs. The economic fallout will weigh more heavily on this country than the disease. 

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  • 2 months ago

    that's not true at all. You've been watching too much Fox. 

  • 2 months ago

    What documentation do you have for that claim? 

    Entering today, the worldwide mortality rate, total cases divided by total deaths, is 3.9%  The US mortality rate is 3.4%.

    The mortality rate for cases with a resolution, total recovered plus total deaths, divided by those deaths, is higher. As of now, of the 11.2 cases with a resolution, the world mortality rate is 6% and the recovered rate is 94%. In the US it's 6.5%.

    Both sets of rates are falling as more testing is revealing more milder cases that would never have gone to a hospital, and as medical care is finding new and better ways to save lives. But the rate is never going get anywhere near the ridiculous number you gave. I'm guessing that it will be somewhere between 1% and 2% when it's all done. It is FAR from done. If there is a second wave that is due to mutation and not just spikes in new outbreaks in places where it slowed down from the original outbreak (California in the US is the only state so far, Florida and Arizona and Texas never had a big problem early on), then all bets are off.  If mutation causes a true second wave across the world, the mortality rates will be going back up.

    A mortality rate of just 1% out of 100 million infected people (approaching 17 million today and is very possible)  is 1 million dead. We are at 666,000 now. Just 334,000 more deaths from 83 million more infected is impossible.

    YOUR mortality rate of one TENTH of 1%, out of 100 million infections, is 100,000 dead. YOUR mortality rate of one TENTH of 1% of the 17 million cases right now is 17,000 dead.  There are 666,000 dead. Do you know how ridiculous you look?

  • 2 months ago

    It's hilarious to still see people who think they can figure out the mortality rate simply by dividing deaths by "confirmed cases", as if everybody ever infected became a confirmed case.

    Obviously, the vast majority of people infected never had any symptoms or had only mild symptoms, and so never became confirmed cases.  You'd need to include them to get the real mortality rate.  The best estimates, based on serology surveys, indicate that this is AT LEAST 20 times the confirmed cases.

    This information has been out for months, and this has been explained over and over again.  Why are they still pretending otherwise?

    You're right, it's 0.1%.  The problem isn't that people think this justifies draconian lockdowns.  The problem is that they simply don't know how to think.

  • 2 months ago

    Try 3.4% in the US.

    149,256 deaths and 4,351,997 confirmed cases.

    And that is with the now altered HHS numbers.

  • 2 months ago

    Where is that mortality rate from? That's far lower than anything I've seen.

  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    This is a political year. The worse the better for affixing.

  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    Or, how many deaths do we need to get before people start wearing masks?

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