I have a negative from the 1930's.  Can it be developed into a picture?

10 Answers

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  • Favorite Answer

    It has already been developed. You want to print it onto paper.

    Places like CVS and Walgreens still offer printing from film, but if you just have a single negative, I'm not sure if they can use that. It's worth looking into that locally. If those don't work, the google search you want is something along the lines of:  where can i have prints made from negatives

  • alan P
    Lv 7
    2 weeks ago

    Negatives do not copy very well in a regular scanner.  I have some very old negatives that are too big too fit in a modern negative scanner.  I photographed the negatives on a light table and then used photo editing software to convert the picture to a positive.  To get the picture the right way round photograph it from the shiny side.  This is my mother (born 1934) with her parents

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  • Anonymous
    3 weeks ago

    It depends on how good a shape it is in. I have some black and white negatives from the 1950s and they are still in good condition and prints can be made from them. Black and white negatives generally last a lot longer than color negatives. Color negatives from a more recent vintage may have faded to almost nothing.

  • 3 weeks ago

    Yes, but DON'T mess about with it yourself in case you damage it. This is definitely a job for a professional. Don't just hand it to a 15-year-old cousin with an aptitude for photography (no offence, 15-year-olds) but take the trouble to find an expert.

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  • Sumi
    Lv 7
    3 weeks ago

    Yes.  Any negative from any era can be printed.

    A negative by its very definition is already developed.

    The negative can be printed.  How, where and how much will depend upon what size & type of negative from the 1930s you have, what medium you wish to have it printed on, and how large of print you want.

  • keerok
    Lv 7
    3 weeks ago

    It's already developed but yes, it can be printed on paper.

  • Marli
    Lv 7
    3 weeks ago

    The negative is 80 to 90 years old. I think a print could be obtained if the negative was handled with care.

      I  would call or email a professional photographer or a camera store or a museum or public archives. Tell them of your find and ask them if they would assess the condition of the negative and  if they would either make the print (and what they would charge you to do it.) or if they could suggest a photographer who specializes in old photographs and negatives.

    I  know nothing about photography, but I have seen positive prints done in the 1990s that were taken from negatives circa 1910.  The original negatives were a little bigger than a man's thumbnail.  The technician (or whatever the correct job title was) made larger negatives of those negatives (roughly 3 x 3 inches) and the positives were made from them.  I  don't know how it was done.  I know that the order took months because my boss said "At last!" when word came that the results were being shipped to us.  Some of the images were quite well defined  for pictures from such tiny original  negatives (in my uneducated opinion)  and others looked fuzzy or murky.

  • Anonymous
    3 weeks ago

    Yes, you can get it converted directly to digital by scanning the negative. (This is best done professionally but you can use any digital camera including phone, but the results are not as good) No need to print out first that would be a lower quality. The negative scan is then reversed using Photoshop (or similar app). While in Photoshop dots and blemishes can be repaired. It can then be printed out.

  • Anonymous
    3 weeks ago

    Mary, you want to take that negative to a photography and camera store that does developing. While mainstream stores still develop and print rolls of film, you want more expertise as well as someone who knows how to handle film so old it's brittle.

  • 3 weeks ago

    Yes, of course. 

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