Was it really Yoko Ono who was responsible for the breakup of the Beatles?

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  • 4 weeks ago

    No, most  texts written about the entire thing,  clearly state she was the scapegoat,  mainly by angry fans.........but she did NOT have anything to do with the break up,  and it was mainly a clash of ego's between Paul and John.

    There are countless interviews were John was getting too big for his britches.... and claiming to be the REAL  (and ONLY) talent behind the group,  and as you can imagine, that certainly ruffled  Pauls feathers. 

    It had nothing to do with YOKO......and after they split.......Paul settled the argument by findng new success with his band WINGS----while Lennon  produced fairly crappy solo albums.   So clearly Paul was the talented one. 

  • 4 weeks ago

    Both Ringo and George Harrison had no problem playing on John and Yoko's post-Beatles albums. So it seems the two of them had no problem with her.

  • 4 weeks ago

    The answer is no! Rent a copy of "Let it Be" to get an idea at how fed-up they are with each other by 1969. John was going through the motions; Paul was playing the boss, George was mostly annoyed and Ringo, who knows? Ringo always seemed the most even-tempered. Further, rent a copy of Martin Scorsese's brilliant tribute to George Harrison, "Living In The Material World," to understand that it was never about Yoko. It was four guys that had been hanging out together through some of the most intensely emotional, financial changes (fame and fortune) that anyone could endure, and this was during a time when the entirety of western culture was changing everywhere. Each one of The Beatles was coming into their creativity and with maturity. By 1969, there was the grotesque influence of record producer Allen Klein and the tug-of-war for who would manage the Beatles. McCartney was pushing for Lee Eastman (his father-in-law), and this had the Beatles barely speaking with each other. It's debatable as to who called it quits first. Some have said that it was Ringo, John or Paul. Accounts vary on this point because it would seem they had all become fed-up by the time Yoko came around. Having Yoko in the studio was just another annoying thing for an already irreparably damaged fraternity of good friends.

    In recent interviews, Paul McCartney has categorically denied that Yoko had any negative impact on the Beatles' demise, and likely, it's not him being nice.

  • 4 weeks ago

    No. That's just a silly, tired idea.

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  • Anonymous
    4 weeks ago

    We do not really know what happened behind the scenes, but we do know that Paul was the one who left the Beatles, and before that he disappeared from public view for a while, and people were speculating whether he was still alive. The last album the Beatles made was  Abbey Road, and they poked fun of the rumors by having Paul walk bare foot (dead man wears no shoes) in the album cover photo. The fab 4 lived like a family in the early years, but as soon as they stopped touring, they started growing apart emotionally. The fact that women got into their lives did not help.

  • 4 weeks ago

    Her and drug abuse.

  • 4 weeks ago

    No.  Tensions existed before Lennon met her.  The others may not have been crazy about her being in the studio when they were recording, but she was a minor factor. Harrison was already going his own way musically and spiritually. Lennon and McCartney, while still publishing as Lennon-McCartney, were mostly writing separately. 

    Business-wise, the big dispute was between McCartney and the other three, with Lennon in the lead. Apple Records had been formed in the wake of manager Brian Epstein's death, and without someone to oversee it, the company was bleeding cash. They wanted a new manager, and the Lennon-McCartney feud was over Allen Klein, who Lennon wanted (and Starr and Harrison agreed) and Lee and John Eastman, father and brother to Linda McCartney. Klein became the band's manager and the Eastmans the bands attorneys, but that proved to not work so the Eastmans were fired. McCartney was constantly outvoted 3-1 on many important decisions and he sued to end the legal partnership and publicly announced he was quitting the band (though Lennon was the first to want to quit and Klein, ironically, persuaded him it would be bad business).

    Klein was later sued by the band and the management agreement terminated, and Lennon made a statement that McCartney may have been right to be suspicious.

    Tons has been written about Klein and how he figured into the breakup of the band, and in it, you will find very little about Yoko Ono. In fact, Klein sued the Beatles in 1973 and Ono represented the band in the case, with a settlement being reached in 1977.  Had the other three been so against her, that never would have happened.

  • Anonymous
    4 weeks ago

    If so, she deserves a medal.

  • No, it was their massive ego's

  • Anonymous
    4 weeks ago

    Paul now says no, but he didn't always. Is that revisionist history or is it a more realistic analysis acquired through age and wisdom, who knows? I mean, the breakup correlates with Yoko coming into the studio during recording, which had always been sacred ground significant others were barred from, but correlation isn't necessarily causation. Also, if the breakup was because disease had set in, was she the disease, or was she just a symptom, or was she irrelevant? We'll never really know.

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