When someone attributes an individual’s success to social privilege (an indicator about groups), is it the correlation-for-causation fallacy?

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  • 1 month ago
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    I believe it is. A statistical average is not an individual. Compared to a socially disadvantaged group, an advantaged group might have a higher percentage of successful individuals, but both groups are likely to have both failures and successes. If social privilege was the cause of success, all socially privileged individuals would succeed, and no disadvantaged individuals would. 

  • 1 month ago

    Arguably yes, because while social privilege does indeed help, it does not guarantee it and it may not necessarily be the actual reason for success as one can achieve success even without it. Furthermore, one may still fail even with the benefit of social privilege. As such, social privilege is not a reliable factor when it comes to personal success, thus attributing one's success to this one factor is misguided at best, fallacious at worst.

  • 1 month ago

    Until you see the C suite and boards be 2/2 women and have a balance of cultures and color similar to the population— it looks like causation. Imho

  • 1 month ago

    There is evidence that shows that social privilege is linked to success that is not correlational.

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