If I'm employed at Disney and work on something original in my free time, does Disney now own my original property?

Say that I'm an artist at Disney and I work on a sketchbook while not at work, and from that book I get an idea for a show that I don't pitch to Disney. Because I'm their employee, do they now own my sketches and idea? If so, how is this practice fair? I've heard this is a common thing at gaming companies and BuzzFeed

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  • Anonymous
    3 weeks ago

    That would be covered by a contract.  That's going to cover any IP issues, if your job involves that.  If you're an artist for Disney then they'll have some kind of contract with you which spells out what they own.  But if you're just some "cast member" at a park then you're completely free to come up with artistic ideas in your spare time, just like anyone else who works for any other company.  Just because you're employed doesn't mean you surrender all autonomy and rights to your employer.

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  • Anonymous
    3 weeks ago

    Most likely they'd leave ya alone unls yu

    ended up making major coin off such vnur

    & only then would they try to clm rgh's to

    it yo :-()

    {}{}{}{}{}{}{}{}{}{}{}{}{}{{}{}{}{}{}{}{}{}{}{{}{}{}{}{}{}{}{

    • W
      Lv 4
      3 weeks agoReport

      What? Did anyone get that?

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  • 4 weeks ago

    If you did this while at work, they would own it because they were paying you at the time. If you did this on your own time while not getting paid, it is your property. 

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  • 4 weeks ago

    Nope not at all

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  • 4 weeks ago

    nah, disney, state of florida, and the u.s.government stole the lands from the Native Americans

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  • 4 weeks ago

    Yes, sadly!!!!!

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  • 4 weeks ago

    You would have to agree to it for that to be the case otherwise anything you work on with your own tools and on your own time belongs to you. 

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  • 4 weeks ago

    There are in fact many companies that have such clauses in their contracts.  You would have to read the specific contract.

    It's a paranoid practice based on edge cases where an employee might use insider knowledge or whatever to develop a competing product.  Non-compete clauses that restrict where a person can work after they leave a company are similar.

    The problem with the clauses is that they're overly broad.  If they were narrowly tailored they wouldn't be a problem.

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