What steps and periods did you take before you became a good photographer?

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  • Sumi
    Lv 7
    1 month ago
    Favorite Answer

    Took photo classes and learned the fundamentals of photography such as basic composition, how to use manual mode, how to develop/print film.  Today, you'd learn how to use Photoshop instead.

    Took a lot of photos.

    Purchased photo books - not how-to books, but books showing the work of photographers, and then study their styles.  Good investment, too.  Many of the books that I paid $75 for and now out of print and worth $300-$500.

    Took a lot of photos.

    Read books/magazines on photography.

    Took a lot of photos.

    Went to gallerias and museums to study paintings and photographs.

    Took a lot of photos.

    What I found, and I think other will agree, was that as I improved I stayed at that level for a while.  After plateauing for a while, I noticed an improvement, and the I'd plateau again.  It just seems that I improved, stayed at that level, and then slowly improved over time.  This doesn't seem to ever stop.  Even high-end famous photographers say that they are always improving some part of their photography.

    As you guessed, taking a lot of photos is critical.  By a lot, I'm talking probably somewhere in the vicinity of about 1,000 images per month.  Taking a lot of photos will train your eye on how to see as oppose to simply looking at the scene being photographed.  It'll also train your eye on how to edit.  By this I mean being able to know ahead of time what is and what is not a going to be a good shot.  In my photojournalism classes, I was constantly criticized for taking 2 or 3 rolls of 36 exposure film, while others would shoot 5 rolls or more.  But by this time I was already able to NOT take copious amounts shots because I was editing out the bad shots as opposed to my classmates who were taking not.  At the end of the day, my photos tended to be the ones on the front page.

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  • keerok
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Left, right, up, down, all around? I had to move a lot having to work with a single focal length standard lens.

    Periods? None. All exclamation points!

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    I used the family Kodak 126 camera to take many photos. The camera loaded cartridge film, with used once, and expensive flash cubes. The lens cannot be focused, and there were few exposure controls. The pictures I took with them were okay but there were many things I could not photograph, such as close ups of small objects.

    When I was in my early twenties, I finally bought a good camera, an SLR camera with a 50mm lens. That allowed me to do a lot more with my camera. I improved a lot as a photographer because I started reading a lot about photography equipment, techniques and so on by reading photography magazines and books. I further improved when I got more lenses as the 50mm just cannot shoot far away subjects and it does not get me as close to my subjects as I wanted. I got a macro lens and a telephoto lens.  My photography improved even more when I got a DSLR camera and a very good 400mm lens made by Tokina and an even better one made by Sigma. WIth a DSLR camera, I can instantly review my results instead of having to wait until the film comes back (if the developer did not lose it).  I can take a lot more pictures than with film and I don't have to rewind film and put in new film or carry a lot of films. I can take several pictures of the same subject quickly, faster than my thumb could advance the film lever.  Don't let people tell you that better equipment does not make a better photographer. They are bullcrapping. It is true that a great photographer can take great pictures with an ordinary camera but there are pictures that even a great photographer cannot take if he/she does not have the right equipment. Try to take a picture of the moon for example with a cell phone camera. Try to take a picture of a basketball game played indoors without a fast telephoto lens.  Good luck.

    • Iridflare
      Lv 7
      1 month agoReport

      "Don't let people tell you that better equipment does not make a better photographer. "
      It doesn't!  But it gives you more opportunities!  

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