How likely will the Democrats be able to get rid of the Electoral College with these requirements?

2/3 majority in both Houses and 2/3 majority of the states

https://go.cbcpac.org/page/s/pet-end-electoral-col...

7 Answers

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  • RICK
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    The 2/3 requirement in Congress would be almost impossible 

    The 2/3 requirement  among the states would be easy if the polls are even close to accurate 

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  • 2 months ago

    ZERO..........unless they ever control  2/3rds  of both Houses.  Because republicans damn sure don't want to get rid of it,  because they would never win another election. 

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  • Foofa
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    My guess is that with the exodus of voters from "blue" states to "red" states in search of affordable housing that the DNC will eventually drop this desire. When all the so called "swing" states are solidly blue they'll have no reason to try to change the Constitution. 

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  • Desire
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    NEVER!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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  • Tmess2
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    As noted, by others, that is 3/4 of all states.  The reality is that, short of a constitutional convention that drafts an entirely new constitution, the odds of actually abolishing the electoral college are slim and none.  The electoral college only makes a difference in close elections in which the country is evenly divided.  As such, the anger over the result tends to be one-sided making it difficult to get to the required supermajority.  When you have a series of normal elections, the anger about the electoral college tends to die down.

    Of course, the Supreme Court might help improve those odds by reminding voters that, under the Constitution, electors are free agents, but there are reasons to think that the court might back away from that.

    More likely, at some point, we will see some movement towards the use of the national popular vote instead of state popular vote to pick electors.  The current draft compact has some flaws that require congressional actions to fix.  But, if the circumstance arose that enough states were committed to using the national popular vote, you would probably see the congressional actions required (e.g., how to do a national recount if needed).

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    Once the demographics tip even further away from Republicanism, it won't be an issue.  But there will be another couple decades of increasingly desperate cheating on the part of the Republican party.  Trump is already gearing up to challenge the results of the upcoming election.

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    • RICK
      Lv 7
      1 month agoReport

      Warren T  you mean like the GOP azzwholes in Texas did and ended up removing thousands of valid names

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  • Jeff D
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    Constitutional amendments need to be ratified by 3/4ths of the states, a 2/3rds majority of the states isn't sufficient.

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    • Jeff D
      Lv 7
      2 months agoReport

      Yes.  Amending the Constitution was intended to be difficult; it takes a very broad consensus.

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