J.J. asked in PetsDogs · 2 months ago

Good Tenant Wants Another Dog?

Tenant has been with me for over 2 years now and signed another 2 year lease. She has a 55 pound hound 11 years old and no problem what so ever. She now wants another dog- a puppy to train since her dog is getting old. She is willing to put up another $400 non-refundable pet deposit and an addition $25 per pet rent. Would you let her have two large dogs. I don't really have a problem.Just want a feed back on this...

Update:

This whole thing has now changed....Tenant just said she is getting a therapist prescription for an emotional support animal. Do I have to allow this?

Update 2:

TENANT HAS COMPLETELY CHANGED & IS REFUSING AN INSPECTION. I AM NOW NOT GOING TO ALLOW ANY OTHER DOG NOW. SHE IS AT THE END OF HER LEASE TERM. I WILL JUST PUT HER ON A MONTH TO MONTH SO SHE CAN END THIS UPON GIVING A 30 NOTICE. SEEMS TO RUNS HER DOG TO DEATH FROM MARATHONS. THAT IS NOT ACCEPTABLE & SEEMS IT WOULD BE ABUSE TO THE PET.

16 Answers

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  • Ocimom
    Lv 7
    2 months ago
    Favorite Answer

    I would not renew her lease or just go month to month.  I wonder why the sudden change in behavior if she's been a good tenet for 2 yrs.  No more dogs allowed.

  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    You CANNOT deny an ESA because the tenant is refusing inspection.  Since the tenant is not allowing an inspection (assuming it is a reasonable inspection), YOU NEED TO GIVE NOTICE OF TERMINATION OF TENANCY.  Wait until the courts are open and you would be able to file for eviction should they fail to vacate.  Be sure you document the tenant's non compliance with the inspection.

    If you think there is animal abuse, you need to report it to the authorities. 

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  • patty
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    i remember this woman who lived up the street from me. She had about 3 dogs and would go out twice a day  walking these dogs to death. 

    This woman has been there a while and pays her rent so do u really want to get rid of her.

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  • 2 months ago

    Not my home so why would I care? Puppies are a MESS. They piss and poop EVERYWHERE if the person isn't adamant about crating them to housebreak them. They also chew up the carpet, bite corners of walls, scratch doors, etc. If this was my place? No way in Hell.

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    It's either a certified service dog or it's a glorified pet.  You do NOT have to accept glorified pets.

    My tenant has 3 dogs.  She's never been a problem, they've never been a problem - BUT the house is on 1.5 acres with a 1 acre fenced backyard.

    I do not charge additional rent/an additional security deposit/a non-refundable security deposit.  In fact, in MY State non-refundable deposits are illegal.

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  • 2 months ago

    Why not indeed.................. Yoü say No way   .... Having read your add now. I FULLY AGREE I disdain such people abusing the system with fake service dogs.

    A pity you didnt furnish that info with your original question though:

    As if you had you would have received a very different answer to my original answer.

    Fair play to ya for refusing on those grounds though..... Genuinely:

    Attachment image
    Source(s): I know other war vets with genuine physical problems that have genuine service dogs that have been obstructed from entering shops because of the actions of fake service dog users
  • 2 months ago

    Shes a good tenant, no problems.. Willing to pay depost and fee for the dog... Id say the negotiation is fair, let her have a puppy. A good tenant is worth their weight on gold.. Keep her happy.

  • *****
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    If your tenant is a responsible individual and has not caused any issues for you, I would allow her to have a second dog, subject to written agreement that allows you to retract permission if the dog is disruptive or destructive. Also check with your insurance as to any breed, size, or age restrictions on your coverage, and include those restrictions in the permission. 

    Add: Whether you have to allow an ESA depends on several things. In the USA, the law requiring landlords to allow "assistance animals" as a disability accommodation does have exemptions. You are exempt and do not need to even consider allowing the animal if the housing is an owner-occupied building with no more than four  units, single-family housing sold or rented without the use of a broker, or housing operated by organizations and private clubs that limit  occupancy to members. In general, if you are subject to the FHA, you can still apply age and breed restrictions unless the mental health provider specifies that only an animal of a particular age or type can suffice for the purpose and why. I'd also be asking why the animal you've already allowed her to have does not suffice? Normally such letters only specify that the client needs to be allowed "a dog"- well, she already has one!  You can also decline if allowing the animal causes a hardship- in many cases that would be due to insurance restrictions on breed, size, or age, if you can show that insurance coverage that allows the animal would be unobtainable or notably more expensive. The animal can also be excluded if it is a danger or disruption to others. 

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  • 2 months ago

    Is this an apartment or a home? Is there a backyard for the dogs? I do not see a problem with your side to allow her another dog but she is going to be living a nightmare trying to get the old dog to accept a puppy. She needs to introduce the two dogs on neutral ground before she takes the pup home. A MAJOR issue will be the invasion of a new dog in old dogs territory & there will be much conflict between the two. But that part is her problem. Just hope she knows enough about the two meeting & how the pup is INVADING the old dogs territory & what the home dog is capable of with a new pup. If this woman is a good tenant & has a well trained old dog, she may know what she needs to do. If she is ignorant about introducing the dogs you will hear that pup scream to high heaven when corrected by the old home dog. Pup is not hurt, just scared to death & it sounds so much worse than it really is.

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  • 2 months ago

    In my opinion, I would say yes but maybe with a new contract of guidelines. Her first dog sounds like he’s given no cue of disturbance (which is odd for the hound breed, unless he’s mixed). However, this new puppy may not have the same behavior. This one could Be a liability if he ever gets off leash or maybe is a nuisance barker.

    With an additional contract that would address possible situations that may arise that could potentially cause a serious danger to another person or animal would be need to be noted. Control over disturbance barking, snarling or aggression would need to be rectified if present with a certified trainer and proof shown. Liability if the dog were to break loose or the owner loses control over the lead. And of course spay or neuter would need to be proven

    I would Personally give this tenant a chance as she’s been worthy in the past. I would just make sure to have a new contract and insert a “Strike Rule” limit.

    Source(s): Certified professional dog trainer
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