Anonymous
Anonymous asked in PetsDogs · 2 months ago

Advice on raising a Blue Heeler puppy?

I’m getting a blue heeler puppy next week. He’s around 2 months old. I heard blue heelers are very energetic so I want to know what kind of “jobs” I can have my pup do to stay active. Also I would like advice on how to potty train him and how to teach him to sit and lay down basic commands and I would like to teach him to be off a leash without me worrying about him running away. If you have any advice I would love to hear it!!

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    Smart people research first and buy second.  Other than that, dogs don't potty train well.  They can't flush, because they don't have thumbs.  Try housebreaking instead.

    And do your own research instead of posting this over and over and over.

    I suspect you are a child and it's not your dog.  Children can own property.  Dogs are property.

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  • 2 months ago

    You should be getting all of this information from the puppy's breeder. There is no one better to ask.

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  • 2 months ago

    It is a canine, you raise it like any other canine. All canine learn the same way & most owners do not know very much about dogs. Even the ones that have had several dogs stay ignorant about dog/canines.

    You can google things like, 'how to potty train a puppy?', 'teach puppy not to bite', those two start the day you bring the pup home. All puppies bite, & every dog owner had to train the dog to go outside to potty. & then in a few weeks you can start Basic Obedience. The more research you do on this dog will help you far more than you will ever know. Learning things about dogs & their behavior & their body language & their instincts & & & & so much you need to know to do justice to your new best friend.

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  • 2 months ago

    Consider these are VERY active, working dogs.

    Expect to walk/jog/run a minimum of 5km every day (twice a day is better) plus at least 30 mins 'play' with ball/frisbee etc every day plus at least 30 mins training every day.

    This is the MINIMUM to keep a dog like this mentally and physically healthy.

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  • *****
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    I would strongly recommend that that you reconsider this breed of dog if you have to ask for extremely basic training advice here and do not already have a strong desire to seriously participate in a specific dog sport or herding with your dog. In my experience, if it's not something you have a strong desire to do already, it's not something you're going to be consistent in doing. This is a difficult and challenging breed of dog that is not suited to be just a pet and not a good choice for a novice dog owner. When underexercised and understimulated, they often exhibit some extremely problematic behaviors in the home. I live in rural cattle ranching country. Our shelters are loaded with heelers, border collies, and various mixes thereof. I see these dogs a lot.

    I know a lot of working heelers, and they can be great working dogs. They are hard to beat in herding beef cattle. However, those I've known that were bought as pets rather than working or serious sport dogs mostly have ended up in shelters, or relegated to backyards due to destroying their home, spending their days barking their heads off, biting visitors, and trying to dig out of the yards. People are drawn to their beautiful color, but what is most important with a breed of dog is whether their behavioral characteristics and exercise needs area good fit, not what they look like.

    A friend of mine who is a marathon runner got a heeler puppy many years ago, intending it to be a running companion. Her daily (long) runs were NOT ENOUGH for the dog. The dogs behaviors were a nightmare. He was extremely destructive, would herd children very aggressively, killed her grandmother's cat, and barked excessively, triggering complaints from the neighbors. She was constantly taking him to trainers, with the consistent guidance being that the dog was BORED and underexercised. She signed up for agility classes and got casually, but not seriously, involved in the sport. It was still not enough for the dog, which continued to be destructive in the home and dig or climb out of the yard when left for any period of time. She'd think she fixed the fence to be escape proof, and he'd find a new way out. Even ended up on the roof once. Eventually he was hit by a car and killed. While prior to this she thought heelers were her dream dog, being very active, she'll never have another and has opted for dogs with much more forgiving temperaments since. 

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  • Maxi
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    Day one starts the training routine , where it will sleep, when it eats, toilet training, so after waking, after playing, after eating and several times inbetween, you take th dog outside and stand SILENTLY until the pup toilets, as it is doing the toileting action, you use a command word ( I use 'clean') so you are teaching the pup that action has a word, that toileting is done outside and within a few weeks you also have a pup who will toilet on command, which is very useful thoughout its life........ you have at least two months before the pup has the ability to control its bladder/bowels so if/when the pup toilets inside that is your fault for not keeping an eye on him/ not taking him out enough.... so do not blme the pup as it is your fault not his... you just put the pup outside and clean up and say nothing, so it is easier to have the pup on an easy clean floor and 50/50 white vinegar/water removes the smell of where the pup has toileted.... and remember you need to be more observant, sniffing likely mens it is looking to toilet, so just open the door/take outside/stand silently/command.

    YOUR job and the pups job for the next 2 months are to learn obedience commands, ALWAYS you  command when you already have the action, eg, you encourage a sit, using a treat, hold it towards the nose and immediately move your hand up and over its head, it will naturally sit, as it does you say 'sit' and give treat, so that way action connected to command and never command expecting an action, recalls either name or come can be practiced at least 4 times a day each time you feed and once the pup comes 100% when called you add 'sit' once he 'gets that', you add 'wait' before he gets his food.......... learn to wear a collar, so put a soft collar on, leave it for a couple of minutes, take it off and do that several times a day leaving it a little longer each time ( any good breeder will have already taught this before 8 weeks old), once the pup accepts a collar on, then clip on a cheap lead and let it trail, that enables the pup to get used to the weight of a lead, it will pick it up play with it, drag it around etc and within a few days you can step onto the lead, command 'wait' and the pup will learn what wait means, then release your foot and use the release command ( I use 'free'), this can be used such as at the door, when some calls, you step on the trailing lead and you are in control, you can pick the lead  up and walk a few steps the drop it, so you are starting to teach walking and not pulling on a lead......... and all these very basics are new to the pup, it is learning new commands which you can use throughout its life in many different situations, you are building a bond with your dog and teaching him that you are in charge, what you say happens and you have done it is a safe/secure environment BEFORE you start taking it out and about once it has had its vaccinations.

    I take my pups out from day one, carrying it tucked inside my coat while remaining  silent so it gets lots of social experiences of new sounds, smells and sights but still feels safe, so it is not all new once it is on a lead and walking on the floor, I put pups in my car when cleaning it out, start it/switch it off and also nipping down to the shop/vet so they are not fearful/anxious and don't experience car sickness later on.

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    Purchase a friend for him. Perhaps a Red Heeler named Trixie.

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  • A
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    A blue heeler is an Austrailian Cattle Dog, they are very active and social dogs.   Look around for a reputable dog training center and see if they have a 'puppy socialization' class.  Just small groups of puppies of similar sizes and they just get to run around, meet other puppies and play, it is a valuable socialization for him.

    Potty training- use positive reinforcement training, take him out frequently, like right after eating and every 20 minutes until he does something, then praise and treat him.  he will learn that if he goes outside he will get a good treat. Do not scold or punish for accidents, even children take a long time to potty train, a puppy could have an occasional accident up to a year old.

    there are great training videos online, but getting into a basic manners class after puppy kindergarten is valuable, the trainer will teach YOU how to train your dog.  Keep taking classes and you might want to get into agility, rally obedience , trick dog classes,  all things you can practice and will increase your bond with your dog.   good luck

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  • 2 months ago

    The person you should be talking to about ALL of this is your puppy's breeder.  Nobody knows their chosen breed better, honestly.  Don't rush into any formal training - puppies have a very short attention span and, like children, need to be given time to be puppies.  Any training needs to be built into PLAYING with him - that's all.   And your first training will all be about housetraining, and getting him used to wearing his collar and then his lead.   And starting to recognise his name (come).

    Do not use pee pads - these are a hiding to nothing and you'll only end of having to do his housetraining properly in any case.

    Get him to your vet within the first 48 hours  - we advise people to leave a day between coming to the new home and seeing the vet so you don't hit him with too much early on.  Try to collect him early in the day so he has all day to explore before the 'first night'.

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  • 2 months ago

    Use small treats to train him. Speak the exact command before each discipline. In the beginning start with sit. Say sit in an authoritative tome. Then push the puppy's butt to the ground. Follow with a treat and praise. Repeat this over and over until he does the discipline on his own. As far as lying down it is usually easier once he is sitting in front of you. Show him a treat and lower your closed hand to the floor while saying lie down. Most dogs will do it in order to get the treatment more easily. Don't give him the treat until he is completely lying down. Again give the treat then praise him. Keep training sessions brief with a puppy. If you don't they will lose focus and you'll become frustrated and the dog will see the times as something to be avoided rather than fun. As far as other aspects I suggest you go on YouTube and look at some training videos. Hunting dogs need a lot of exercise in order to not have behavioral issues. Find a dog park close to home where he can run around in a large open area that is surrounded by a fence. Always observe the other dogs that are there looking for aggressive ones before you let your puppy off-leash. If you spot one then you need to decide if you want your dog near him/her or not.

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