tara asked in Society & CultureLanguages · 1 month ago

What's the verb in this sentence: Sue and Ray are eating yogurt?

My 7th grade English teacher gave us this question, and he said the verb was yogurt. Yogurt is not a verb, so he's obviously wrong. 3 whole years later, people who were in that class still have arguments about it. A small minority believe "yogurt" is the verb, because that's what the teacher says. The rest of us are debating on whether the verb is "are" or "eating". I think it's "are". Who's right? 

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  • Pontus
    Lv 7
    1 month ago
    Favorite Answer

    The verb is a verb phrase:  are eating.

    are - is the helping verb (indicating the present tense)

    eating - is the main verb (the "present" participle form, although it can be used in any tense. It indicates the progressive or continuous aspect). 

    The two work together as a single verb (eat, in the present progressive tense). 

    Any answer saying only ARE or only EATING is incomplete. 

    Yogurt is only a noun.   The yogurt, that yogurt, healthy yogurt -- all phrases that only work with nouns).

    It's not a verb, because you can't say things like:  

    They are yogurting; They don't yogurt.  They were yogurting.  They would have yogurted.   He yogurts every day.    All those would work if yogurt were a verb. 

    Source(s): taught French to English speakers; almost became an English teacher, studied English grammar & linguistics; native English speaker. 100% certain. Three other foreign languages (I understand grammatical concepts, beyond just one language).
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  • 1 month ago

    Perhaps your teacher was testing you to see if you would believe blindly anything he said, even when it was obviously wrong.

    The verb is "are eating", which is the Third person plural, Present Continuous form of the verb 'to eat'.

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    Teacher must've been trolling y'all. Because wtf?

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    are eating - verbs

    yogurt - a common noun!

    Your teacher needs help!

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  • 1 month ago

    The full phrase "are eating" is called a verb phrase or driving part of a predicate phrase with "eating" as the main verb and "are" as what is called the auxiliary or helping verb.  The word "yogurt" would undoubtedly be a noun and the object (not subject) of the sentence.  "Sue and Ray" are the subjects of the sentence.

    English is such a dumb language grammatically.  No wonder everyone speaks it incorrectly.

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  • IOM
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    "Are" and "eating". 

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  • 1 month ago

    That is exactly why you aren't an English teacher. Next question.

    • darkvelvetrain
      Lv 7
      1 month agoReport

      It's exactly why this person ought to be.

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  • 1 month ago

    It is NOT 'yogurt' .  Nobody 'yogurts' anything.  People can 'be' things (are) and people can 'eat' things .

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  • 1 month ago

    A sentence can have more than one verb. Are is a helping verb and eating is a present participle. Both are verbs.

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  • P.L.
    Lv 6
    1 month ago

    ARE is the answer.

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