American Passport?

I'm British but my biological father is America (we have zero contact) But I am in contact with my half brother who is full American also. Can I apply for an American passport thru my half brother without having any dealings with my biological father & if yes how long does the whole process take & what documents do I need. Thank you x

8 Answers

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    Of course not! Where do you this it is? India?

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  • Foofa
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    If your father was a US citizen at the time of your birth and his name appears on your birth certificate you're probably already a US citizen and could just order a US passport at your own leisure. But barring that if you and your half bro have the documentation to prove the relationship he could in theory apply to sponsor you. That would get you a green card and after five years in the US your could apply for naturalization, thus giving you the right to apply for a US passport.

  • Maxi
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    No, unless YOU are an American citizen you can't get a US passport........so it will depend on if your biological father is on your birth cert or not..if he is then you already are a citizen

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  • 1 month ago

    No. You can't apply for a passport through someone. You have to become a citizen, first, and then apply for the passport on your own, as a citizen. Also, you can't get citizenship through a brother. You may or may not be able to use your brother to get a family reunification visa, which would allow you to live in the U.S., without citizenship or a U.S. passport, and after you did that for enough years, you could apply for citizenship, and finally apply for the passport after getting citizenship. The whole process often takes over 20 years. Don't hold your breath.

    • W.T. Door
      Lv 7
      1 month agoReport

      If their father was a US citizen when they were born then they are a US citizen.

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  • 1 month ago

    Trump is trying to end serial migration. Even your father could only petition for you if you are underage. If not, you'll have to find your own way to come. 

    • W.T. Door
      Lv 7
      1 month agoReport

      If their father was a US citizen when they were born then they are a US citizen.

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  • John
    Lv 6
    1 month ago

    What skill (talent) do you have?

    • W.T. Door
      Lv 7
      1 month agoReport

      If their father was a US citizen when they were born then they are a US citizen.

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  • 1 month ago

    @ Boo 

    The USA's citizenship law says that a person born to a US citizen is a US citizen regardless of where they are born. When only one parent is a US citizen then the US citizen parent must have lived in the USA for at least five (5) years, two (2) of which were after their 14th birthday.  That should not be a problem for you if your father has lived in the USA "all his life".

    Note > your < children will not qualify for US citizenship unless they are born on US territory or if they are born after you have lived in the USA for five (5) years. 

    If you have a SSN then they never expire. If you never lived in the USA then you probably got a SSN by your parents registering your birth at a US Consulate and applying for the SSN at the same time. 

    Try to apply for a My Social Security account but don't be discouraged if it doesn't work since you have never paid into the account.

    https://www.ssa.gov/myaccount/ 

    If she is alive then ask your mother if your birth was registered. If no then try very hard to get your US citizen half-brother to find out if that happened and which Consulate & when. 

    https://travel.state.gov/content/travel/en/interna...

    Ideally your original Consular Report of Birth Abroad (CRBA) exists and you can get it.  Perhaps one of your mother's relatives has it. 

    If you can get the original or a copy of your CRBA then it works just like a USA birth certificate and it + proof of identity is all you need to apply for a US passport. 

    https://travel.state.gov/content/travel/en/records...

    If there was no CRBA you can still apply for a passport. Note you will need an affidavit from your father confirming you are their biological child and that when you were born he was a US citizen who had lived in the USA for five years with two of the years after his 14th birthday.  The State Department > may < ask for DNA proof of you being his child if there is no CRBA.

    https://travel.state.gov/content/travel/en/passpor...

    https://travel.state.gov/content/travel/en/passpor...

    Worst case is you will have to apply for a Certificate of Citizenship:

    https://www.uscis.gov/policy-manual/volume-12-part...

    https://www.uscis.gov/n-600

    Once you have the Certificate of citizenship it works just like a USA birth certificate.  However, if your father will cooperate and provide the affidavit then you can apply for a passport directly. 

    When you get to the point you can apply for a USA passport then also get a passport card. The card is only valid for crossing land/sea borders in North America but it is the same level of proof of US citizenship as a regular passport. Keep it separate from your regular passport so they cannot both be lost/stolen at the same time. 

    Finally, if you qualify for US citizenship by descent then you are a US citizen. If necessary, ask your half-brother to make contact with his US Representative (Congressperson) for help communicating with the State Department. 

    Best wishes!

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    • Boo1 month agoReport

      I have to sleep now as it's almost 4am hopefully you reply with good news when I wake up x

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  • 1 month ago

    i would ask immigration about it

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