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What happened to the common, low ranking German soldiers after they lost WW2?

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  • 2 months ago
    Favorite Answer

    if they were captured by the Soviets, they were sent to Russia to rebuild the country they and/or their comrades had raped. The survivors were sent home around 1954. Otherwise, unless they were specifically charged with a war crime, which happened seldom, even to the real war criminals, they spent time in internment camps and once the allies were convinced that they were not war criminals, they were released after they were "denazified" which meant they had to watch some propaganda films, attend lectures, or in a few cases, if they were being held near a nazi concentration camp with unburied dead, they had to bury victims.

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  • 2 months ago

    If they were taken by the Russians they were as good as FER-******. On the other hand, if they were taken by this side most after a while were released and I guess they returned to Germany.

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  • anon99
    Lv 5
    2 months ago

    after the Nuremberg Trials the UK held Military trials after interviewing all soldiers sailors and Airmen some found Guilty were only Imprisoned up to 25 years

    once we settled in we Built some 5 RAF bases and needed to employ germans at RAF Jever we employed about 3000

    and Laarbruch Gilenchursen Bruggen Guterslough Wilderrath all employed about 3000 germans all in low-risk jobs then the RN and the Army employed germans on all bases

    once the Marchal plan took off they started to rebuild Germany in fact many towns by 1955 looked as if they were Never Bombed

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

      That depended where they were captured or surrendered & what their status was.  My wife's uncle (adoptive father) was a Gefreiter (U.K./Commonwealth Lance Corporal) in an ambulance company with 20th (Mountain) Army.  They surrendered to U.K. troops in northern Norway in late May 1945.  Because he was 44 yrs. old & married, he was quickly released & was back with his wife by mid-Aug. '45. 

      P.O.W.'s in N. America were generally all sent back to Germany by the spring of 1946.  

      Younger men in Europe, especially if they were single, were usually made to work in construction or like tasks in one of the formerly occupied countries for up to 3 years.

      Those gathered by the U.S.S.R. had a sketchy end.  About 1.1 million were killed or worked to death (usually recorded as "pneumonia', including my wife's father).  Many of these weren't released until 1955, after an agreement was signed between the U.S.S.R. & the new German Federal Republic ("West Germany").     

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  • Mike
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    I fellow I knew was a teen aged mechanic in the Lutwaffe. He told me he was made to work in a French coal mine for 2 years.

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    “40 acres and a mule?“ Of the 250,000 German and Italian POWs that the Russians captured only a few thousand ever returned to their homelands. Many German POWs confined in the USA decided to remain in the US and eventually became citizens. Many in Colorado.

  • Very interesting... Dificul to choose best answer.

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  • Kieth
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    They went back to work,some left the country. I knew an old man who was a radio operator for Germany, then he came to America and joined the army as a radio operator during the Korean war.

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    You mean the ones that weren't 12 or dead?  The six of them got together and had a beer.  

    But seriously, most who hadn't been killed ended up being killed because they were conscripted by the Allies to do the extremely lethal work of finding and removing the millions of landmines Nazis had placed throughout Europe, especially buried in the sand along beaches.  The average life expectancy of anyone doing this was less than two weeks, which is why the Allies rounded up every Nazi soldier they could find and made them do it, the Allies employing their own soldiers to oversee and force the now former Nazi soldiers doing it instead of doing it themselves.

    It's rarely talked about or mentioned in history books, which is why I was surprised when a movie came out about it a few years ago called Land of Mine.

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