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Anonymous asked in Education & ReferenceHigher Education (University +) · 2 months ago

Dual credit acceptance at big universities?

My school/state offers a "free or reduced" dual credit opportunity for incoming seniors (me). I have great grades and many extracurricular involvements so I'm hoping to go to a big and/or prestigious university. Here's my question, I was talking to a career specialist and she told me that a college such as Stanford may not accept the dual credit I received if I take it at a community college (which would be free) instead of a local university (which would just have reduced price.) Is this true? She didn't seem certain when she said it but it's enough for me to be concerned. It's time to apply to the school I plan on doing my "concurrent" with so I need to know if what she said was entirely true. Is there a way I can go to all of my top college choices websites and see? 

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  • 2 months ago
    Favorite Answer

    Here is Stanford's policy from their website. They are more likely to accept credit from a university than a community college.

    Transfer credit is reviewed and awarded by Stanford's Office of the University Registrar according to Faculty Senate policy. While Stanford has no articulation agreements with any college or institution, a course generally receives transfer credit if it meets the following conditions:

    It is completed at an accredited institution

    It is substantially similar to courses offered at Stanford

    It is completed with a grade of C- or better

    It does not duplicate, overlap or regress previous coursework

    The transferability of specific courses is ultimately determined by the Registrar's Office once students are admitted.

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  • 2 months ago

    Some top schools won't give you college credit for high scores on AP exams or dual enrollment courses. You'll need to check each individual school to find out what their policy is. The quickest way to do that would be to go to the school's website (such as www.stanford.edu or www.ucla.edu) and type in "AP credit" in the school's search engine.

    • Lili
      Lv 7
      2 months agoReport

      Indeed, I couldn't get credit at Yale for my AP exams. That was back in the late 70s, but you're right, students need to check.

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  • 2 months ago

    You may be mixing up a couple different concepts:

    1.  If you intend to transfer credits earned at a community college, you would be a transfer applicant rather than a freshman applicant.  For a school like Stanford with a 99% retention rate, your chances of being accepted are basically zero. Most of the top 50 universities have retention rates over 95%.

    2.  Every university has their own standards about what credits they will or will not accept from another college or university.  It is very common for a university to reject credits earned from a community college if they feel the course is not equivalent academically to a similar course at the university.

    3. In states like California there are agreements between many community colleges and the state university systems (UC and CSU) so that students attending a CC have a better chance of being accepted as a transfer and keeping more of the credits they earned. Private universities don't have these arrangements. 

    • ilovellamas2 months agoReport

      So do you also think they wouldn't accept transfer credit from Oklahoma University?

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  • 2 months ago

    The only way to be certain would be if your top college choices have an "articulation agreement" with the community college or local university. 

    Community colleges nearly always have articulation agreements in-state public colleges and universities, with for-profit universities, and sometimes with public colleges and universities in bordering states. 

    Most not-for-profit private universities don't have articulation agreements, especially the more competitive ones like Stanford. It is always at the discretion of the university whether to accept a class for transfer credit. 

    Universities are more likely to accept transfer credit from a university than from a community college, but there's always a risk they won't accept transfer credit even from a university. 

    If you can take the classes at a state university, I'd think odds are good that transfer credit would be accepted, but no guarantees. 

    Does your high school offer AP classes? These look better to the most competitive universities than dual enrollment, and nearly all accept AP credit. 

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  • Squid
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    Go the CC website and download the information for the course you plan to take, including a course syllabus and topic list.

    Email that to the Stanford addmissions office and ask if that course would qualify for transfer credit.

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  • Lili
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    A university like Stanford would likely not consider that community college courses met their academic standards.  When students try to transfer from CCs to major universities with which the CCs don't have articulation agreements (this usually applies only to state universities within the same state as the CC), they often find that many of their credits will not transfer.

    These things are usually decided on a case-by-case basis. I suggest that you send individual inquiries to the Admissions offices of the schools that interest you for general information.

    I attended Yale and Penn myself.  I'm pretty confident in saying that they would likely not accept most CC courses.

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    • Lili
      Lv 7
      2 months agoReport

      apply to Stanford for all four years. Apply to some other elite schools, too. If you don't get into any, go to OU and try to go to an elite university for grad school.

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