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Question about dry wells?

Today my landlord hooked up my washer and dryer and the people’s washer and dryer who live upstairs to a dry well in the backyard. He said he is ninety nine percent sure there is one in the backyard but would he know just by hooking it up if there is one there? And how does that work, where does the water and soap go? Do all houses have a dry well and can you be sure there is one there? My current landlord took over his father’s job.

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  • 2 months ago

    A drywell is a tank in the ground with holes in the side walls water can drain out of. It is surrounded by lots of gravel and the top is covered with dirt. The drain line feeds grey water (washer, shower, sinks as required), no toilets, into it and the water drains out into the gravel and then the ground eventually. Not all houses have them, some feed all the waste water including toilets into the septic system which is a tank and a leach field. Only way to know what is there is to dig and uncover it.

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  • 2 months ago

    not all houses have them. if the connection exists, it is strong odds that is does exist. or landlord may have been told by his father that it does exist.

    "dry well" is, in essence, a covered pit filled with gravel. The idea is that the washing machine's few gallons used are dumped into the gravel and then leech away into the soil like other grey water. Used washing water [shower, bath, lav, kitchen sink with no garbage disposal, a/c drain, and floor drain] can also be dumped into same dry well.

    In climates with freezing winter temperatures, the waste line leading to the drywell needs to be below the frost line.

    Source(s): granddad
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  • 2 months ago

    The simplest dry well is a big hole in the ground filled with rock and perhaps sand with dirt and sod over the top. It is common for farm use when washing out the barn of organic material. Also common in urban areas for gutter runoff from large roofs. However, it would not be coded to my knowledge for grey water runoff from a washing machine. Just a big hole in the ground with airspace for the water to go until it is absorbed. For grey water, a septic tank does pretty much the same thing.

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  • Droopy
    Lv 5
    2 months ago

    Well if he hooked it up to drain it's going to dry well or sewer.  As far as where does it go it soaks into the ground.  Laundry water is considered gray water.  Which is safe to reuse or dispose of in a dry well.

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  • y
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    He hooked it up to something that is already buried, built in the ground. Could be a dry well, old septic system, old french drainage system. Only way you'll know is if it works. Some places have made it illegal to to use them anymore. Others encourage their use. Not everyone has them, my old house had two of them on the property, this house doesn't have any. There are a couple of different construction types to them. What you have, I have no idea. Basically it's some sort of weeping pit or tank in the ground, that allows water and such to disperse through the ground. At rates that the earth/area and such, can handle. If you end up with a mud puddle in the yard, it isn't working.

    • Nuff Sed
      Lv 7
      2 months agoReport

      One of my neighbors discovered his "dry well" also supported the French drain when the dry well got silted up and soapy water started percolating up into his basement.

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