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carlo asked in Society & CultureLanguages · 2 months ago

When do you add "and" when you mention a number?

101

Do you read it "one hundred and one" or "one hundred one"?

How do you read "101,101"?

One hundred one thousand one hundred one?

One hundred one thousand one hundred and one?

One hundred and one thousand one hundred and one?

How about 127?  One hundred twenty seven?  One hundred and twenty seven?

How about 1,015?  One thousand fifteen?  One thousand and fifteen?

I've been wondering when you add "and" and if it is necessary.

I'm studying English.  Thank you in advance.

4 Answers

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  • 2 months ago

    Usually we say 'and' for the first nine numbers after the hundred - so one hundred and one, one hundred and nine, two hundred and three. Most people would say One oh one, one oh two, two oh seven, etc if they are reading addresses, ages, room numbers. the 'and' usually only comes up when counting out loud.

    101, 101 would be "one hundred and one thousand, one hundred and one" because of the usage I mentioned first.

    127 would usually be spoken as one two seven if talking about an address, or one hundred twenty seven. Rarely we would say one hundred and twenty seven if we're trying to emphasize the number in some way, like "guess how many people were in that classroom? One hundred and twenty seven!"

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  • 2 months ago

    No.  There's no reason to add "and."

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  • Pontus
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    It's either dialectal or a personal choice.

    AND - never has to be added.   I personally never do (I haven't paid attention if that's just me or if everyone in my dialect area does that too). 

    Many people think that shorter is better.  That's not an absolute fact.  Many English dialects (and many other languages) often prefer versions that are unnecessarily longer.  Reasons can include preferring how the longer version sounds or to provide emphasis.  Emphasis is a valid reason for longer versions or repetitions of things. 

    Shorter and more efficient has its place, as does longer.

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  • 2 months ago

    If your counting out loud like that then there’s no need to add and between numbers. One hundred one, one thousand one, one thousand fifteen etc. Adding and is acceptable too but it just adds unnecessary clutter when it isn’t needed for accurate context.

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