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Anonymous asked in Education & ReferenceWords & Wordplay · 2 months ago

what is the difference between culprit and suspect ?

9 Answers

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  • 1 month ago

    A culprit can exist without being a 'suspect,' and without being involved in anything that would lead to the person being a 'suspect.'  EX:  The chalk in the classroom keeps disappearing.  There is a 'culprit' in the classroom who is taking the chalk, but no one person is a suspect.

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  • The difference is; one is still free of suspicion until they are caught as a suspect.  :D  

    • Lv 7
      2 months agoReport

      this isn't true. electropath, you are excused.

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  • Kate
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    A Culprit or Offender is proven, A suspect is alleged to have done something.

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    • Lv 7
      2 months agoReport

      Guess what an allegation is, electropath. Right! An accusation! lol

      You are excused.

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  • RP
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    A culprit is one who has done something improper whereas a suspect is a person who may have done something improper or is under suspicion.

    • Lv 7
      2 months agoReport

      Now that I think about it, this isn't even true, electropath. A culprit can be a fun person.

      John: Who decorated the hall with all these fun Christmas cards?! :)
      Pete: I think Mary is the culprit! :)
      Both: :D :D :D :D

      You are excused, electropath.
      (I'm not TDing anyone)

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  • 2 months ago

    Anyone may be a 'suspect' but only one person will turn out to be the 'culprit'.

    • Lv 7
      2 months agoReport

      Since elctropath is such an expert, he should have commented on this answer that it is not true only one person will be a culprit . 9/11 is a major example.

      electropath, you are excused.

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    See edit.

    Both culprit and suspect mean ACCUSED

    But GUILT is the difference in culprit. So..

    culprit = ACCUSED and GUILTY

    suspect = ACCUSED

    Note: When I posted my answer 5 days ago, I was *extremely* satisfied I answered your question well (as did a couple of other answers). Now I see it's a stupid competition of petty non-corrections and thumbs down posturing.

    "Mea culpa" as mentioned in a comment IS "I accuse myself."

    And a cop following a suspect IS a tentative accusation which is still an accusation. Why the heck would a cop follow a suspect if he didn't tentatively accuse the person of some sort of guilt?

    Same "expert" says in another comment: "Suspects are people who are thought to be possible culprits, with or without allegations being made."

    An allegation is an accusation! lol .

    FFS

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    • Lv 7
      2 months agoReport

      Now I see you say "Suspects are people who are thought to be possible culprits, with or without allegations being made."

      An allegation IS an accusation. (facepalm)

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    Culprit means the person the person who is to blame for something; suspect is the person you think is to blame, but you cannot yet prove.

    Culpa is Latin for blame

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    Suspect is being investigated as a culprit.

    A culprit means you know who did it.

    • p2 months agoReport

      A suspect can run faster than the policeman chasing him. A culprit was the one not as fast on his feet and who got caught. Just joking.

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  • Olive
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    Culprit is the one that is actually doing the crime. Suspect is one that is believed to be the one doing it but its not one hundred percent for sure

    • Nuff Sed
      Lv 7
      2 months agoReport

      True, although a suspect may become a convicted felon even if he literally didn't do the crime.

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