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Prowse asked in Arts & HumanitiesHistory · 2 months ago

Who won War of 1812?

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  • anon99
    Lv 5
    2 months ago
    Favorite Answer

    the British and Canadians

    US objective to Annex Canada Failed

    the British to save Canada achieved we chased Jackson all the way from the Great Lakes to the Gulf of Mexico that is a Rout in anyone's language

    the USA was Bankrupt  and the British went home not asking anything from the USA except they keep the west for the Indians

    • anon99%
      Lv 5
      2 months agoReport

      note in 2012 Canada issued a medallion to celebrate the Victory 

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    Status quo ante-bellum. Easier to say who lost most – The Native Americans, mainly those south of the border.

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    A lot of answers here by people who know S.F.A. about the War of 1812.  The fact is that the U.S. declared the war & thought that it could capture & annex all of British N. America by the simple act of marching in.  After all, it outnumbered us by more than 26 to 1 in population.  

    When it was all over, not a single one of the avowed U.S. aims had been achieved while 100% of those of Britain had been.  The U.S. was virtually bankrupted by the war & was in economic peril until the 1830's.  It wouldn't have been able to finance 

    the fielding of an army for an 1815 campaign.  Meanwhile, Britain was prepared to send over the whole of Wellington's Peninsular Army, which had so severely ravaged the French in Spain.       

    The U.S. lost more than 2X the number of casualties.  When the war ended, large tracts of U.S. territory were in British hands while not one teaspoon of British N. America was in U.S. hands.  

    The only thing that makes the war seem it was a tie was that in the Treaty of Ghent, Britain agreed to let borders return to their pre-war status.  

    Andrew: I'll do what I choose to do, & it's none of your business why I do it.  Try to understand that I don't give the slightest particle of dam about what you like or don't like.           

    It seems we have some poor propagandised U.S. dummies who can't handle the truth.  I bleed internally for them.   

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    • Andrew
      Lv 7
      2 months agoReport

      Killmouseky, no reason to hide behind anonymous. Find a spine and post publicly, or better yet, don't bother leaving your silly tripe to begin with. 

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  • 2 months ago

    Canada.

    In wargaming, there is a concept called Victory Conditions. One uses such conditions to determine what qualifies as a win when the sides in a game are very unevenly matched.

    In the case of the War of 1812, the Victory Conditions were basic: A US victory was conquering British North America, IOW, Canada. A Canadian Victory was preventing this.

    At the end of the war, Canada had not been conquered. Thus, Canada won.

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  • Andrew
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    The conflict barely merits a footnote in Britain as it wasn't a particularly important or interesting conflict. Essentially, nobody outside of North America really devotes any attention to it, but Americans and Canadians tend to have pretty strong feelings about it, for pretty obvious reasons. 

    In the strictest sense, the war ended in a draw. It's often forgotten that it was the United States who declared war on Britain, not the other way around as many people mistakenly believe. And while there's plenty of debate when it comes to the outcome, there's an even greater degree of confusion when it comes to the actual causes of the conflict. 

    The United States didn't appreciate that Britain was stifling its right to trade with other nations and impressing its sailors to fight in the Royal Navy, both extremely understandable gripes and very valid reasons for wanting to go to war. 

    For some bizarre reason, many Canadians foolishly believe that the United States was compelled to go to war to seize portions of Canada, or possibly the entirety of Canada, but that's just a ridiculous claim. Of course the Americans were hoping to diminish Britain's hold in North America, and it's true that the United States did attempt a small scale incursion into Canada that was repelled, but the operation could hardly be called an invasion, and it was the British regulars who were stationed in Canada who did most of the fighting on the defender's side - not Canadians. 

    Canada didn't exist as its own political entity and there was really no semblance of Canadian identity at the time, so the conflict serves as a point of pride for Canadians because there hasn't been a whole lot to be proud of in Canada's short and fairly pedestrian history, so it's hardly surprising that Canadians would continue to obsess over the whole affair today over two hundred years later. 

    And the British obviously had bigger fish to fry at the time. Had their ultimate goal been to re-take the United States, they would have conducted themselves very differently and it's doubtful that the Americans would have been able to maintain their independence. Luckily for the Americans, Britain wasn't interested in reacquiring her breakaway colonies, and the British were willing to come to terms in the end. 

    The performance of the Americans wasn't particularly impressive overall, but there were a few notable campaigns and operations and battles that gave the British pause. They certainly put up a very gallant fight for being so hopelessly outnumbered and outgunned and outclassed. 

    But it's really the long-term effects of the conflict that matter, and they count for much more than one side being able to claim a marginal military victory over the other. The British came to the realisation that the United States had wholly and completely stepped out of Britain's shadow. The Americans were ready, willing, and able to defend themselves and to accept nothing less than being treated as equals. The British never instigated any further incursions against the US and they adopted a markedly different attitude in future negotiations with Washington. The Americans had defeated the greatest power in the world in 1781 and they managed to hold their own against that same power three decades later. Not only did that resonate with Britain, but with the whole world. 

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  • 2 months ago

    No war was ever won. Left only misery and hate behind!

    Peace.

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  • 2 months ago

    It could be said that both sides won and at the same time both sides lost. The treaty that ended that war was one in which both sides gained something they wanted while conceding something they could afford to loose. I think in the annals of history that treaty stands out as a standard for how to end a war in such a way that both parties to the war can become allies.

    • anon99%
      Lv 5
      2 months agoReport

      Canada won they are not USA American

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  • Phil
    Lv 5
    2 months ago

    It was technically a tie.

    The US say they won and the British say they won.

    • anon99%
      Lv 5
      2 months agoReport

      the usa invaded Canada to annex it they Failed they Lost

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