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Why is assembly language so hard!!?

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  • Marvin
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    Naw man it is not hard.  Assembly is a series of very small steps.  Once you have created your libraries and no longer have to write everything from scratch, you can program in assembly as fast as you can with C or other languages.

    Source(s): Over 20 years in software development.
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  • 2 months ago

    Computers are really just logic.  Over the years developers have found ways to make communicating witht he computer easier.  

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  • 2 months ago

    Assembly language is not difficult, but it's finicky. You have to be very closely aware of the hardware you're running on, especially the CPU and its registers. 

     If you need math functions, other than the simple add subtract multiply and (sometimes) divide that come with the CPU, you have to write them yourself.

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  • 2 months ago

    Yes, compatibility is a very serious issue. Java and C# do solve the problem, however, that causes performance hit and some end-users do not like Vms like NET Framework or JVM.

    www.nozsol.com

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  • 2 months ago

     Assembly language is not difficult It will be a little harder to learn than one of the other Pascal-like languages. However, learning assembly isn't much more difficult than learning your first programming language.

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  • 2 months ago

    I'd say it's somewhat like the reason that putting together a 2,000-piece jigsaw puzzle is harder than solving a 48-piece children's puzzle.

    The lines of code you write in assembly are more numerous and each is typically a smaller part of the whole picture than lines of code in a language like Java or Python.

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  • 2 months ago

    I suspect it's the issue of breaking problems down to smaller, weirder, and more dangerous pieces than you're used to, and having to specify every step explicitly. Keep hammering away, you'll get it. I enjoyed working 'close to the metal' on small computers and embedded devices because it was me talking directly to the chips to make that noise or gather that input.

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  • 2 months ago

    There are new concepts to learn, and you have to interact with the operating system in a way that higher level languages hide from you.

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  • EddieJ
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    Probably for the same reason that riding a bicycle is hard -- no matter where you are going, you're getting further away from somewhere else.

    Has anyone suggested that you write the program in a high-level language first, and then hand-assemble it?

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    • Snezzy
      Lv 7
      2 months agoReport

      all done in half an hour while everyone else was futzing around trying to get anywhere near the right code.

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  • 2 months ago

    It was a lot easier back in my time, the time of 8 and 16 bit processors.  Processors have gotten a LOT more complicated, so the instruction sets are also more complicated.  OTOH assemblers have gotten a lot better!

    • Markus Imhof
      Lv 7
      2 months agoReport

      Leave assembly to RISC systems :-)

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