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Anonymous asked in Arts & HumanitiesHistory · 2 months ago

Why did so many people die during the Siege of Leningrad?

11 Answers

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  • 2 months ago

    They died of cold and starvation.

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  • anon99
    Lv 5
    2 months ago

    Because Hitler would not allow the Germans to retreat and the Result was the Loss of 1,000,000 men and all their equipment and 10,000 horses and that was only the German side maybe Millions on the USSR side

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  • larry1
    Lv 6
    2 months ago

    Because the Nazi battle plan for Leningrad was not to take it by force but to just surround it and cut it off so everyone inside it would starve/ freeze to death. By the battle plan there were to be no survivors/ prisoners only the starved and froze to death corpses in an intact city. Their plan almost worked so the deaths were very high about 1/2 the population about 600,000 civilians dead + 600,000 troops.

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  • Joseph
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    The city of over a million people had ALL of its food supply stored in a single place which Germans promptly bombed off the map.  The Soviets also failed to evacuate the civilian residents and refugees flooding into the city.  The ordinary citizens had to subsist on a ration of just 125 grams of bread workers got a bit more; that is if you were a resident of the city.  If you were a refugee from the countryside, you got no ration at all. Some mothers would give their rations to their small children but, in the long run, that turned into a double tragedy, since once the mother died, the children soon died also.  

    There were a lot of abuses too.  The party elite had food, including meat, fish, dairy, baked goods, and even chocolate and wine specially flown in for them.  Plant managers would not report deaths of the workers so that they would keep their rations for themselves.  There were also reported cases of cannibalism.  

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  • humpty
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    It is important to remember that the Russians were unprepared for Hitler's attack. Stalin had signed a nonaggression pact and was supplying the German war effort with raw materiel, so he was convinced that Hitler considered Russia an ally. When Hitler struck the Russian forces were surprised, encircled and destroyed piecemeal.

    Therefore, when the Germans reached the outskirts of Leningrad and Moscow both what was left to defend the cities were a few surviving troops and a desperate civilian population, armed with little more than molotov cocktails and small arms. The population dug trenches and tunnels, carried shells to the few cannons by hand through snow and rain, and died in their thousands with their faces to the Nazis.

    In Moscow the ballerinas from the Bolshoi dug ditches by day and danced in the evenings. Writers and actresses manned the firing lines. Leningrad was no different. At this crucial point in histroy the Russian people themselves chose death over dishonour, holding back the Panzers long enough for the winter to set in and cut off German supply lines.

    They paid a steep price that did as much as anything else to win the war.

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  • 2 months ago

    The primary cause of civilian deaths during the siege was starvation and complications as a result of starvation. The bread ration, made of bread which at some points had sawdust as a filler, was 125 grams or four ounces per day. The ration varied based upon the military situation. At one point, the nazis got lucky and bombed a food warehouse. Slow starvation lead to many illnesses which not fatal in themselves, had a cumulative effect.

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    It was cut off for so long  (two and a half years) no food getting in, no fuel, harsh winters. By any definition it was genocide. The citizens were also determined not to surrender since they were likely to be exterminated and the city flattened. Visit it today (St Petersburg) and it is hard to ignore the huge cemeteries and memorials to a very shameful episode in both Finnish and German history.

    • bluebellbkk
      Lv 7
      2 months agoReport

      It was a hideous and appalling episode but it was not 'genocide'.

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  • Dj2541
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    Mainly  because the Russians  didnt  move the  Civilian population  out  of  Leningrad when they had  the  chance?

    The Germans  were not prepared  for a long  winter  war?

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  • ?
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    The city was surrounded and bombarded for more than two years. With supply routes cut or conpromised for that period, most of the citizens who werent killed by artillery shells starved, or froze to death because they had no heat during the brutal russian winters

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  • 2 months ago

    There is a difference between a siege and bombardment of a city.....A siege is a Surrounding and wait for a surrender......

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