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Anonymous asked in Arts & HumanitiesPhilosophy · 2 months ago

is it ethical for me to accept medical care of $120,000 on credit, it i will die before i can repay it?

it would take about 37.5 years, when my life expediency is only 5 or less.

Update:

the medical system is not likely to go broke. 

it has a lot of charity to relieve people's suffering.

plus, financial charity from the wealthy.

3 Answers

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  • 2 months ago
    Favorite Answer

    The whole system is corrupt so don't worry. Medical debt is the main reason many Americans go bankrupt and lose their homes. The main thing the medical insurance companies want to do is bleed you dry, and they are still maximizing their profits.

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  • 2 months ago

    "life" the highest value.  the quality of all other values are based on the value of life itself?

    there is a trade-off of value, as to whether a person's actions are hurting another person; the ethics clause.

    it is Ok to live one's life without hurting others, as the individual owns their own life. 

    if there is not an other option, then take the money, get the medical care, and repay the money if you live long enough.

    it is the doctor's job to keep you alive that long, he benefits monetarily, but are you or anyone else benefiting by your life existence?

    even then, i find life has value in itself.

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    Not to fret it.

    No Lender will issue such a loan, unless you have something to put up for collateral.

    A lender will require "collateral" as a default payment for such a loan, so in Probate the lender Will Recover its money.

    When the "state" assumes care it will put the person in Bankruptcy, by seizing all the person's real property, insurance, personal property, investments, pensions, and financial accounts.

    • michinoku2001
      Lv 7
      2 months agoReport

      I not so sure about that, given the amount of unsecured debt some people have. Just look at the mortgage crises in 2007. 

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