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Does Voltage over comes resistance to create flow.?

does voltage over comes resistance to create flow.

9 Answers

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  • Anonymous
    4 weeks ago

    No.

    The resistance is the load.

    The current that the load draws is the flow.

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  • D g
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    voltage is pressure

    resistance is  reverse pressure holding it back like a tap partialy closed

    voltage just pushes what  electrons have enough energy to  get past the  resistance

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  • 2 months ago

    The voltage represents a potential energy for the current. It's like a pencil on your desk that will fall to the floor if you knock it off. The resistance interferes with the flow of current by collision within the resistor and therefore regulates the AMOUNT of current that flows. Some people like the water flow in a pipe analogy, but there's a tendency for students to carry the analogy too far and applying the analogy becomes more complicated that the reality. As an electronics engineer, I personally think it is an unnecessary and sometimes confusing "simpliication."

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  • LG
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    Agree with the previous answers that say there's no threshold, no break-point, to overcome.  The amount of flow achieved is proportional to the push(voltage) divided by the resistance.

    The water-in-a-pipe analogy is often given in these cases.  The tiniest bit of water pressure will result in a tiny flow through a given pipe diameter.  And that flow will keep increasing with increasing pressure.  If a larger pipe is used(analogous to lower resistance) more water will flow for a given pressure.

    The electrons in a metal do not have to "break-free" from their atoms to move from one atom to the next.  They're free to move from one atom to the next because there are plenty of available states with similar energy levels in adjacent atoms.  This is not true for non-conductive materials, where an amount of energy has to be given to an electron to break free from its atom, as there are no available states in adjacent atoms with a similar energy level.  In a non-conductive material, there IS a threshold that has to be overcome in order for flow to happen.

    Resistance comes about due to moving electrons bombarding atoms and causing them to vibrate, producing heat, with the electron losing energy(creating a voltage drop) in the process.  The higher the current density(more current in a small wire), the more electron scattering, bombardment, and heat produced within the material.

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  • Jim
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    THe voltage breaks the electrons loose from their atoms, and makes them 'slide' into making current.

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  • 2 months ago

    Yes, the current flow depends on the voltage and resistance. I=E/R.

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  • 2 months ago

    Sure, that is how long distance power line using this way.

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  • Dixon
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    In a way but "overcome" sounds a bit binary. Voltage is like an amount of "push" given to each unit of charge, kind of like pressure. Then resistance is like friction impeding the flow. So if that is what you meant, then yes :-)

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  • 2 months ago

    Sort of ... but that's really the wrong way to think about it.There is no "overcoming", there is just a relationship between voltage, resistance, and current.

    Electric current = Voltage divided by resistance.  The more voltage, the more current.  The more resistance, the less current.

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