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Is there any place in the universe where gravity is 100 percent absent?

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  • 2 weeks ago

    Sorry, but no. Only time there would be no effective gravity is falling to the mass barycenter.

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  • 2 weeks ago

    I doubt it   .

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  • Zheia
    Lv 6
    2 weeks ago

    It would have to be somewhere so remote that there is absolutely nothing. It may be that if the universe began with a big bang, then the oldest objects would be furthest from the epicentre and furthest from each other as they move apart. But even then gravity could be very weak in the space in between.

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  • 2 weeks ago

    There is absolutely none

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  • 2 weeks ago

    The centre of a lonely planet would come close

  • 2 weeks ago

    Probably not. I say "probably" because in practical terms there could be a place so distant from anywhere that any perturbation it could cause would be smaller than the Planck Length, but I very much doubt this happens.

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  • 2 weeks ago

    Yes. There are points where all forces of gravity cancel out. Lagrange points are places where the the Earth's gravity and sun's gravity cancel out. 

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    • ANDY
      Lv 5
      2 weeks agoReport

      Nick...But if you are stable in one place and don't feel pulled in any direction, then in that spot where you are gravity will have no effect on you. This is what Jeffrey K meant.

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  • 2 weeks ago

    Not any more.  But there was a period after the Big Bang when there was only energy.  Matter was not created yet, so no gravity.

  • 2 weeks ago

    No... 

    Gravitational force is defined by the equation:

    F = G(m1)(m2)/r^2, where the Force is equal to the Gravitational Constant, times the mass of body one, times the mass of body two, all divided by the distance (r) between the two bodies, squared...

    As you can see, as r gets large, the force F gets very small - but, it's *never* zero... 

    So, in the visible universe at least - gravity should reach to every where we can see - and (mathematically at least) beyond. 

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  • Bill
    Lv 7
    2 weeks ago

    "100 percent absent" is a meaningless phrase, but I'm sure there are places where gravity is .0000001 percent of what it is on earth's surface.

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