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Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Science & MathematicsBiology · 1 month ago

In some species the females can reproduce by themselves. Is there any species where males can do that?Shouldn't males have this ability too?

8 Answers

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  • 1 month ago

    Any organism that can reproduce by itself is, by definition, not a male.  You question is not about biology, it's about the definition of words.

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  • Cowboy
    Lv 6
    1 month ago

    nope, males don't have the proper equipment.

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  • MARK
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Males cannot do it for the simple reason they only have the gamete called sperm. A sperm contains only chromosomes to be passed on to the next generation. However, the female gamete, the egg, is a relatively large cell which in addition to having chromosomes also has all other cellular components. This can then develop into a new individual. The sperm has no other cellular components which would enable the cell to function and survive.

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    • Smeghead
      Lv 7
      1 month agoReport

      Sperm do not lack mitochondria. In fact, they have a massive ****-ton of mitochondria, because they need tons of energy to swim. They simply fail to pass those mitochondria into the oocyte upon fertilization.

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    Males only produce sperms, and sperms do not have the necessary nutrients for a new animal to develop into an embryo. It is little more than a packet of DNA with enough energy to allow ther sperm to swim. Females that produce by parthenogenesis have eggs with the necessary nutrients to develop into a hatchling. Parthenogenesis only results in female offspring. Whiptail lizards and some salamanders can reproduce parthenogenetically and these species are all female.

    There are some animals that can reproduce by fission. A flatworm for example can split into 2 animals, one with head only and the other with tail only. The headless animal can regenerate the head and the tailless animal can regenerate the tail. For such an animal, males can certainly reproduce asexually. The same is also trur of hydras. If they are cut in half, each half can regenerate the missing parts. So too can starfish. If they are torn apart, they can regenerate missing parts.

    Hydras can also reproduce by budding. A new individual simply grows out of the body of existing one and the new individual will then break away.. I am not sure whether males can reproduce by budding or not, but there is little reason why they cannot do so.

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  • 1 month ago

    I guess so.. does It mean that being male is a secondary, not necessary thing in Nature? I've heard that males help diversify the pool genes but still... 

    Besides, i've heard that they managed to fertilize an female egg with another female egg in laboratory. So what's the point ? Might aswell give up and leave this reality to females... :/ I really think we should start to think in a way of males having they'r kids on theyr own, and I guess I'll never be ok with Nature for making so males are in total need of females to exist...

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  • 1 month ago

    The male seahorse takes the eggs from the female, and then gives birth to them...but no. Males simply dont produce eggs despite being able to fertilize incubate and give birth to their young. Now if you wanted to replace the female with something like a test tube...

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  • 1 month ago

    I can't think of any examples.

    Imagine a population of hydra in which all individuals can reproduce by budding.

    There are also some individuals that produce female gonads, some that produce male gonads, some that produce both, and some that produce neither.

    Would that satisfy your criteria of "males can reproduce by themselves"?

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    No, because if an individual were to lays eggs or give birth then they're female by default. 

    All 'female' means in biology, is the individual that lays eggs/gives birth. The traits that individual has in terms of their sex are irrelevant, the only one that matters is the ability to give birth/lays eggs. 

    The definition of 'male' in biology, is the individual that provides genetic material to the other. Sexual dimorphism in humans is not the same as other animals. For a lot of insects, for example, the females are bigger and stronger than the males. 

    In parthenogenetic species they have to all be female, but they don't need to receive genetic material as they jumble up their genes to make genetically varying offspring. No species can all be male, any species could all be female. Emphasis on could. 

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