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I was at fault in the car accident ?

I hit a driver recently. She was 20 years old driving her mom's car. I got out of the car immediately admitting to it. I admitted it to the officer. I got ticketed for "following to close". I will pay the ticket in court. I was driving someone else's vehicle also and I'm not on their policy. Their insurance is in good standing and everything, but that has nothing to do with me. Also, i tried to offer a cash settlement of $1500 which i know is far more worth the damage. The cop even tried to persuade the mom when she arrived on the scene. But I guess it just is what it is. My question is, I don't really want to talk to the mother any further. She's rude and nasty and very disrespectful. I had my kids with me that day and she didn't care how she cursed and swore around them. They are triplets and all have special needs and it hurt their feelings. Can we just let the insurance handle it and that be it? And if my friend's coverage isnt enough, im told that they other folks can and will come after me. And that's fine too. Will i be required up front to pay the difference of everything or will the courts allow me some type of payment plan? I'm scared in all of this. Its one thing when you're dishonest. But to be honest, admit everything, try to make amends, and people still want to make mountains out of everything....geesh its terrible. If you didn't want to settle, thats fine. There's no law that says you absolutely have to. But all the other melodrama, i can do without. Help me!

13 Answers

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  • August
    Lv 6
    2 months ago

    You should be thougherley ashamed of yourself having put your kids life at risk.

    "Rude +Nasty" well so would I be if you told me you were not insured-which you are not! This is not a mountain,this/you garbage excuse is not acceptable today. The only good thing you did was to admit liability. I just hope you will be fined heavily and you learn from your mistakes. Man up !

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  • 2 months ago

    If you have insurance, let your company and your friends company deal with this. That's one of the things that you pay them for.

    If you don't have insurance, then someone is going to come to you about this (either friends insurance, other mom's insurance or other mom) and you will have to deal with that.

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  • 2 months ago

    Every insurance policy clearly states NEVER admit liability. The insurance company decides who's at fault. Oops. Too late, you admitted liability. And you had no insurance.

    So the other driver can sue YOU personally. I hope thay take you for everything they can. People that drive uninsured are about the lowest people I can think of.

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    • Parnell2 months agoReport

      Once again thank you @badge 203. We truly do have some miserable low life creeps in the world. 

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  • 2 months ago

    Your friend's insurance isn't going to cover anything, as you were not on the policy.

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    • Badge 203
      Lv 5
      2 months agoReport

      wrong, if the owner has insurance and gave the driver permission to drive her vehicle, then that driver is covered

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  • 2 months ago

    Mistake #1 Admitting to cause. Just give the facts. NEVER assume the blame. There could be other circumstance you did not notice.

    You now must let the Insurance company lawyers handle it now.

    Keep your mouth SHUT. You can only make it worse.

    Many Insurance policies cover, permitted drivers*, unless specifically excluded.

    From my experience, I would expect you to be only liable for Deductibles.

    *unless, taking the vehicle without permission, use of the vehicle for other than the purpose for which it was borrowed or normally used. You are an unlicensed driver.  You were inebriated (DUI), or using the vehicle for an unlawful activity. 

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  • 2 months ago

    If the owner of the vehicle you were driving is insured and she gave you permission to drive the vehicle then her insurance will cover the accident. Many people with out insurance drive others peoples vehicles with their permission and they are covered. Providing you have a valid drivers license which you didn't mention either way, but I am guessing you do.

    If you live in a no fault state, then her insurance will cover her vehicle and your friends insurance will cover hers. The other vehicles owner could sue you (or the owner of the vehicle you were driving) for her deductible however.

    Let the insurance company take care of it. Since you both received a copy of the incident report (accident report number), have the owner of the vehicle you were driving contact her agent and he/she will take it from there.

    If you live in a non- no fault state, then the other driver will probably try to sue both of you for her damages to the vehicle, and if her insurance company pays for it, then they will sue the owner of the vehicle you were driving and you as well to recover.

    You do not have to ever speak to her again. And it is probably best you don't

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  • Bruce
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    You are not obligated to talk to them. Just refer them to your friend's insurance carrier. They may or may not cover it, depending on the terms of your friend's policy. As far as any amount not covered by your friend's insurance, her insurance should take care of that. Her insurance can then sue you to cover their losses, that is called subrogation. Or, they may choose not to go through insurance and sue you for the difference. 

    • Parnell2 months agoReport

      Now this is a good answer! So let's say that I am in fact too, will the court allow me a payment plan through probation or do I have to have it all up front?

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  • GTB
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    Apparently you are an uninsured motorist. This is a stick situation because you were driving someone else's car with no insurance on you. The medical costs are unknown at this time and these could easily be substantial. It is not clear to me if the other car had only the driver or if it had driver + passengers and if other people were in the car the medical issues are likely to be far more. The car damage costs can easily be well over $3,000 alone so the other party has every right to hold off until the data is better defined. You can easily be looking at an out of pocket expense in excess of $15,000 here and with no insurance it will really get ugly. You need legal advice from a competent attorney in the area where the accident happened. Bankruptcy may be your only option.

    • Badge 203
      Lv 5
      2 months agoReport

      The driver does not have to have insurance, the owner of the vehicle has to have it. If the owner has auto insurance then any driver is covered under her policy providing they have a valid DL. So being uninsured is not even a factor in this case

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  • Cei
    Lv 5
    2 months ago

    I would let the insurance handle it all - that's what you pay them for. If she contacts you again pass the correspondence to the insurance company with no comment. If it's verbally (phone or in person) just politely tell her it's in the hands of the insurance and she should contact them.

    Not sure what country you're in, I'm guessing United States, I'm assuming that they refused the cash settlement as they'll sue for damages and and go for a big payout.

    In my county you should never admit fault, insurance companies take a dim view of that and have been known to refuse to pay out because of it.

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    I expect the insurer will decline any claim as you weren't on the policy. You could make an offer to settle in writing with a brief time limit. Head the letter 'Without Prejudice' as this means that it cannot later be admitted in evidence before a court or employment tribunal without the consent of both parties concerned, should settlement negotiations subsequently break down and the dispute come before the court or tribunal.

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